Saints and Sinners

Saints and Sinners A woman walks the streets of Manhattan and contemplates with exquisite longing the precarious affair she has embarked on amidst the grandeur and cacophony of the cityscape a young Irish girl and her

  • Title: Saints and Sinners
  • Author: Edna O'Brien
  • ISBN: 9780571270316
  • Page: 136
  • Format: Paperback
  • A woman walks the streets of Manhattan and contemplates with exquisite longing the precarious affair she has embarked on, amidst the grandeur and cacophony of the cityscape a young Irish girl and her mother are thrilled to be invited to visit the glamorous Coughlan s but find for all the promise of their green gorgette, silver shoes and fancy dinner parties they leaveA woman walks the streets of Manhattan and contemplates with exquisite longing the precarious affair she has embarked on, amidst the grandeur and cacophony of the cityscape a young Irish girl and her mother are thrilled to be invited to visit the glamorous Coughlan s but find for all the promise of their green gorgette, silver shoes and fancy dinner parties they leave disappointed an Irishman in north London retraces his life as a young lad with his mates digging the streets and dreaming of the apocryphal gold, an outside both in Ireland and England, yet he carries the lodestar of his native land.A collection characterised by all of Edna O Brien s trademark lyricism, powerful evocations of place and a glorious and an often heart breaking grasp of people and their desires and contradictions.

    • ☆ Saints and Sinners || Ó PDF Read by ☆ Edna O'Brien
      136 Edna O'Brien
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Saints and Sinners || Ó PDF Read by ☆ Edna O'Brien
      Posted by:Edna O'Brien
      Published :2018-02-19T03:53:22+00:00

    1 thought on “Saints and Sinners”

    1. SAINTS AND SINNERS was written in big words on the chalkboard behind me. I should have gone in somewhere else. I like colors and gray areas, not white on black! It wasn't a good sign, as far as signs go.I didn't want to relive my school days. I didn't want to relive guilt days (vicariously, to be honest), family days and culture days. Not like this. I snuck into the classroom to poke around for a catch up book about sentence structure and grammar (please not Francine Prose's book!). How was I to [...]

    2. bbc/programmes/b01061hyDescription: Edna O'Brien is one of the most distinguished writers and figures in the world of letters. Since emerging from Ireland in the early 1960s with 'The Country Girls', her many novels including 'Girl with Green Eyes', 'House of Splendid Isolation' and 'In The Forest' have attracted both praise and controversy. 'Saints and Sinners' is her eagerly awaited new collection. 1/3 Madame Cassandra 2/3 Black Flower 3/3 My Two Mothers2* The Light of Evening3* Saints and Sin [...]

    3. In this collection of stories, Edna O'Brien's prose is fierce and precise, whether the subject is a lonely librarian waiting for a favorite poet, a ditch digger, or a slow-witted hardware store helper. She seems always to find a description that gets at the heart of a place or character, her dialogue is both crisp and true to the speaker (even when threatening to turn poetic, something that eludes lesser writers), her people sound and look like they have lives outside the confines of her fiction [...]

    4. Edebiyat üzerine söylenen beylik lafların nihayeti yoktur. Bunlardan biri de, edebiyatın ötekinin ve ötekiliğin deneyimini sunarak ben ile ben-olmayan arasına bir halat germesidir. Ben-olmayan’ın deneyimi okundukça halatın boyu kısalır. İnsan kendisini ve ötekini bu karşılaşma ile tanır. Halat kaybolur. Tüm edebiyata mal edilebilecek beylik laflardan biridir bu. Ama özellikle çeviri edebiyatta ve insanlık durumu üzerine yazılan metinlerde kendisini belli etmeyi pek sev [...]

    5. From BBC Radio 4 - Afternoon Drama:Edna O'Brien is one of the most distinguished writers and figures in the world of letters. Since emerging from Ireland in the early 1960s with 'The Country Girls', her many novels including 'Girl with Green Eyes', 'House of Splendid Isolation' and 'In The Forest' have attracted both praise and controversy. 'Saints and Sinners' is her eagerly awaited new collectionNTENTS:Madame CassandraBlack FlowerMy Two Mothers

    6. This week’s headline? sprigs of shamrockWhy this book? booker prize shortlistWhich book format? kindle birthday bookPrimary reading environment? my rural homeAny preconceived notions? short story lionIdentify most with? spinster Miss GilhooleyThree little words? "still love him"Goes well with? undercooked fresh salmonRecommend this to? booker prize opinersSomething I've noticed in my travels is that "foreign life" is not as foreign to me as "city life." I'm a small town girl, and I learn more [...]

    7. I love O’Brien’s stories, and I know I shall return to them again and again because they do not unfold easily, necessarily, the first time. In “Shovel Kings,” a first-person narrator recalls another character (Rafferty) who then tells the story—rather by way of being interviewed by the narrator. Interesting approach, and I’m not sure why it is so effective. If Rafferty tells the story himself, alone, then perhaps there is inherent some sort of weakness in it. If the narrator alone te [...]

    8. My first book for the 2016 Challenge. The book has a blue cover and I got it from the library. It’s a book of short stories of Ireland. Edna O’Brien is a much acclaimed author, often praised for her beautiful writing and stories about women, but I’m sorry to say that while her writing is excellent I found the stories mostly sad and grim. There were too many sad and mixed up people trying to get through hard circumstances and not always succeeding. There was a man just out of prison, meetin [...]

    9. 'Saints and Sinners' by Edna O'Brien - short storiesI found this book languishing and brought it home to read and appreciate. O'Brien's prose is completely authentic and deliciously colourful. I really run out of superlatives there, and find myself wishing I could write as she does. Expert at conjuring places, feelings, emotions. The protagonists in this collection are all, in some way, uncompleted, frustrated or unresolved. Unhappy as they were towards the end of reading, I also found myself be [...]

    10. I guess the title sums up this book better than anything else can. It's about human beings. Not some who are sinners and some who are saints but all of us who are both saints and sinners at the same time. I love the way the author gets right under the skin of her characters; we think, feel, suffer, rejoice with them as they go through life. Obviously, in a collection of this kind some of the stories will appeal more than others. My particular favourite was "Send My Roots Rain." I love the way th [...]

    11. As with most short story collections, some of them are better than others. But "My Two Mothers" was heartbreakingly good, and many of the others were beautiful. Having never read Edna O'Brien before, I picked this up because of jacket blurb from Alice Munro, who is one of my favorite living authors. Munro had this to say, "Edna O'Brien writes the most beautiful, aching stories of any writer, anywhere."

    12. I saw James Wood's review of O'Brien's most recent novel, The Little Red Chairs, a month ago, and it looked great, it looked like something I'd really enjoy reading, but, alas, hardcover it was, so I "settled" with learning more about Edna O'Brien and bought this fantastic collection of short stories.Wow, just wow. Pain from bygone decades roil through this collection. O'Brien gives voice to the voiceless, whether mildly retarded blue collar laborers or the many single women gone a bit funny and [...]

    13. A very moving collection of short stories, each one a little gem. Absolutely nothing here indicates these are written by a writer of O'Brien's age. What is it that makes that impression? Alice Munro's more recent stories focus very much on being older so I guess that because O'Brien has chosen subjects that are not all related to looking back over life we don't think about that either, we focus on what she wants us to think about.The topics are wonderful. How children view the world, mother's an [...]

    14. These stories by one of Ireland's most celebrated writers force the reader to examine relationships, unrequited love, family bonds, and issues of social class. Where do we belong in this world? How do memories persist and impact our daily lives? How does environment affect behavior? O'Brien addresses all of these issues and more in this small but powerful book of eleven short stories set in or related to Ireland.

    15. I suspect I would have given this at least one more star if I had read it rather than listened to it. I kept losing track of characters and getting bogged down in descriptions that I probably would have enjoyed on the page. But I didn't really connect with most of the characters, and many of the story endings left me with a "that's all?" sentiment. That said, I can still tell that Edna O'Brien is brilliant.

    16. The language alone makes this book worth reading. This collection of short stories had a few that I am not sure I fully understand but all of them were beautiful examples of the use of the English language. There are not many authors who write on this level.

    17. Edna O'Brien's mother did not approve of her daughter's literary pursuits, "[My mother] did not know me. She did not understand the compulsion to write" O'Brien was born in 1930 in Country Clare, Ireland. The years immediately after her birth are ones O'Brien characterizes as a time full of "economic despair." The financial misfortunes of the O'Brien family was something that particularly irked Edna's mother. For her parents had not always been poor. In fact, Edna's father's side of the family h [...]

    18. This collection of ten short stories is all about the people and their relationships with each other. Starting with the story The Shovel Kings, we see a woman who encounters an Irishman in a London bar and learns his story, how he came to London as a boy, hoping to make his fortune and return home to a better life, but ended up not fitting in in either place, an exile in both the city he lived most of his life in and the country he calls home.In Sinners, the landlady of a bed and breakfast is di [...]

    19. I've had this one on my bookshelves for a bit - actually, mine is an Advance Readers Edition! But I finally got around to it, and it did not disappoint. I usually enjoy Edna O'Brien's books, and this one is no exception.It's not a large collection - there are only eleven stories - but they cover a lot of emotional, as well as geographical, ground. O'Brien only inserts sentimentality where it logically makes sense, so these are not stories of Ireland and the Irish that contain pots of gold, fairi [...]

    20. I have now read novels, short stories and memoirs by Edna O'Brien, and I've come to the conclusion that it's her short stories I like best. My complaint about her longer prose is that if I read for plot alone I feel like I'm missing the finer points of her gorgeous writing, but if I read for style alone, I have no idea what's going on. Okay, so I might be exaggerating a hair. But the great thing about these stories was that I felt like I could take in both beautiful prose and interesting plotlin [...]

    21. O'Brien's latest short story collection adds no earth-shattering experimentation or big surprise to her body of work. But she presents her thwarted, provincial persons and her rural Irish locales so beautifully that I don't mind at all. She does venture outside of Ireland, notably in "Shovel Kings" (which is sure to be added to many readers' lists of important emigre stories - I think it's the small masterpiece of the collection) and "Manhattan Medley" (one of a few in the collection that deal a [...]

    22. This is a collection of short stories by a contemporary Irish writer who lives in London. Brian picked it out for me for Christmas at the Strand Book Store in Manhattan. He described me [apparently quite accurately] to one of the women who works there and she suggested this book among others. It was a good choice.Some of my friends do not enjoy short stories, but I believe they are perfectly suited to our busy lifestyles. This collection traveled to California with me in April, but I just finish [...]

    23. I must be (fingers crossed) experiencing intellectual growth and curiosity because I've come to appreciate and enjoy short stories. I consider my strength to be creative non-fiction writing and yet, short fiction's call grows louder each day (to read it, definitely, but perhaps to try my hand at writing it, too). O'Brien writes knowingly of Irish-American and Irish life in all its complexity--religion, country vs. city animosity, important but controlling nature of family, the pull to stay, and [...]

    24. It has been quite some time since I have read a short story, possibly not since college. I picked this collection up at a book sale because it seemed to have good reviews on and I wanted to try something different. If you are in the mood for something unrelentingly depressing, then this is what you are looming for. I think I maybe would have enjoyed it more if I hadn't tried to read it like a novel and had taken my time, but I just slogged through it, grimacing. She's certainly a good writer, b [...]

    25. I admit I didn't get very far in this collection, but after several stories it became apparent the overarching theme was "depressing tales of depressing Irish people." I'm not categorically opposed to the morose in fiction, but like any emotion its impact fades when delivered in monotone. I had the same problem with Raymond Carver's Cathedral, which might actually be the same book with a different accent.

    26. Heard long ago about Edna O'Brien and found this short story anthology at the library.Wonderful book!Capturing Irish language and culture in Ireland, New York and London, O'Brien just gives it her best. So liked "Inner Cowboy," "Black Flower,"Old Wounds,and "My Two Mothers." Resounding work. Targeted and full and so much to think about - relationships with parents/family, wrestling with conflicting commitments, finding out about who you are despitel good.Seek out Edna O'Brien. She's a real find, [...]

    27. I chose this book because of the cover quote: "Edna O'Brien writes the most beautiful, aching stories of any writer, anywhere." ALICE MUNROIs there a short story lover alive who could resist that?I wasn't disappointed, although some of these stories are so heartbreaking that the book as if it weighed 1,000 pounds when I closed it and put it down for the night. In other words, heavy on the "aching."

    28. I love Edna. This collection of short stories served as my introduction to her very beautiful mind and natural gifts. PB dropped her name casually, but I picked up the thread as soon as opportunity struck, much to my reading pleasure. And now I have another collection, again with thanks to PB, received as a gift on the occasion of my B-Day. I will not dote on the merits of Edna’s style and skill, she is exquisite and you will love her too.

    29. This little set of short stories grew on me. Maybe I wasn't in the right frame of mind when I read the first half. However, I put it down for about a month and then picked it up again and found myself very absorbed by the characters. But I don't remember much about the first half of the book unless I really think about it The most powerful story was the one about the young girl trying to survive in a war zone.

    30. I picked this one up on the sidewalk next to my building having never heard of Edna O'Brian, but trusting the kind words on the cover from Alice Munro. I would say Alice Munro is an apt comparison. These stories are very spare and quiet without a ton of plot/narrative. I quite liked many, if not most, of the stories. My one criticism would be that the themes started to repeat and the repetition did not serve them, just felt repetitive.

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