The Downtown Jews: Portraits of an Immigrant Generation

The Downtown Jews Portraits of an Immigrant Generation To most Americans New York City s Lower East Side around the beginning of the twentieth century evokes a series of clich s Colorful pushcart peddlers raucous street urchins rags to riches stories o

  • Title: The Downtown Jews: Portraits of an Immigrant Generation
  • Author: Ronald Sanders Hasia R. Diner
  • ISBN: 9781435107366
  • Page: 382
  • Format: Hardcover
  • To most Americans, New York City s Lower East Side around the beginning of the twentieth century evokes a series of clich s Colorful pushcart peddlers, raucous street urchins, rags to riches stories of a one or two generation rise from poverty All this, of course, is part of the story, but in The Downtown Jews, Ronald Sanders goes beyond the clich s He tells the sometiTo most Americans, New York City s Lower East Side around the beginning of the twentieth century evokes a series of clich s Colorful pushcart peddlers, raucous street urchins, rags to riches stories of a one or two generation rise from poverty All this, of course, is part of the story, but in The Downtown Jews, Ronald Sanders goes beyond the clich s He tells the sometimes harsh, sometimes humorous, multifaceted story of the Americanization of the Jewish immigrant.The book centers around the life of a remarkable figure, Abraham Cahan 1860 1951 journalist, catalyst, agitator, and premier novelist of the sweatshop and ghetto life When Cahan became the editor of the Jewish Daily Forward, it was a minor Yiddish language newspaper at its peak, and his, it had one of the largest circulations of any newspaper in America Both as editor of an influential newspaper and writer of the groundbreaking novel The Rise of David Levinsky, Cahan was pivotal to the Lower East Side experience Flamboyant, imaginative, and egocentric, he exemplified, led, and transcended his generation Sanders masterfully portrays Cahan and his times Here are the unceasing ideological battles, the birth of organized labor in the garment trades, the rise of the Yiddish theater in America, and, ultimately, the fall of Yiddish as the mother tongue In the process of assessing Cahan s career, Sanders also takes the measure of an important aspect of American life, the melting pot, and illuminates the Jewish immigrant experience in New York.The Downtown Jews was originally published in 1970 and revised in 1987 this reissuehas a new foreword by Hasia R Diner, professor of Hebraic and Jewish Studies at New York University.Praise for The Downtown Jews An exemplary account of the Jewish Lower East Side in the half century that ended with World War I The New York Times The Downtown Jews takes us into that setting and the life of the downtown ghetto, brings alive the individuals involved the victims of pogroms, poverty, and persecution who had come to the golden shore poets and peddlers, intellectuals and garment workers, actors and laborers Los Angeles Times

    • [PDF] ↠ Free Download ↠ The Downtown Jews: Portraits of an Immigrant Generation : by Ronald Sanders Hasia R. Diner ↠
      382 Ronald Sanders Hasia R. Diner
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ↠ Free Download ↠ The Downtown Jews: Portraits of an Immigrant Generation : by Ronald Sanders Hasia R. Diner ↠
      Posted by:Ronald Sanders Hasia R. Diner
      Published :2018-08-25T18:45:53+00:00

    1 thought on “The Downtown Jews: Portraits of an Immigrant Generation”

    1. This is one of those books I picked up to read when I got a chance. The time is here. I pulled it off the shelf, anticipating I-don't-know-what. I think I expected some sort of rich, inviting cultural narrative. Instead, this work occupies at best a niche market, for those with a particular involvement and interest in the history of New York City and in particular, the distinction between Jews located on the east side of the city versus those downtown.The background information held my interest [...]

    2. Very very dry. Might interest those with a particular link to the area or people. The first chapter about Russia was interesting but loses steam after that.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *