The Devil's Dozen: How Cutting-Edge Forensics Took Down 12 Notorious Serial Killers

The Devil s Dozen How Cutting Edge Forensics Took Down Notorious Serial Killers A forensics expert follows the historic evolution of CSI through a century of serial killers Katherine Ramsland has brilliantly captured the insights and drama of some fascinating cases Dr Henry Lee i

  • Title: The Devil's Dozen: How Cutting-Edge Forensics Took Down 12 Notorious Serial Killers
  • Author: Katherine Ramsland
  • ISBN: 9780425226032
  • Page: 251
  • Format: Paperback
  • A forensics expert follows the historic evolution of CSI through a century of serial killers Katherine Ramsland has brilliantly captured the insights and drama of some fascinating cases Dr Henry Lee in her previous bestselling books Now she examines the case histories of twelve of the most notorious serial killers of the last one hundred years, and answers the questA forensics expert follows the historic evolution of CSI through a century of serial killers Katherine Ramsland has brilliantly captured the insights and drama of some fascinating cases Dr Henry Lee in her previous bestselling books Now she examines the case histories of twelve of the most notorious serial killers of the last one hundred years, and answers the questions What clues did they leave behind How were they eventually caught How was each twist and turn of their crimes matched by the equally compelling weapons of science and logic From exploring the nineteenth century s earliest investigative tools to remarkable twenty first century CSI advances, The Devil s Dozen provides a fascinating window into the world of those who kill and those who dedicate their lives to bringing them to justice.

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      251 Katherine Ramsland
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      Posted by:Katherine Ramsland
      Published :2018-08-27T12:32:52+00:00

    1 thought on “The Devil's Dozen: How Cutting-Edge Forensics Took Down 12 Notorious Serial Killers”

    1. save yourself the trouble and just read the final overview chapter. i'm unsure how the author could take such an easy (in that it's inherently interesting, imo) subject and make it so boring. the only thing it really has going for it is that its major focus is primarily on more obscure killers. also: "These stories are better than fiction, so let's hope for some real-life sequels." really????? let's hope for more serial killers to systematically target and attack, rape, and murder primarily wome [...]

    2. While I found this an interesting and enjoyable read I do have a slight problem with a comment made by the author at the end of the book"These stories are better than fiction, so let's hope for some real-life sequels."while I agree that true life crime stories are better than fictional ones and I do enjoy reading them I am not hoping that more people are murdered so that I'll have something to read.

    3. 5 starsInteresting novel. Liked that we were able to see how forensics was used to catch serial killers. Explained really well. Can't wait to read more of this author's books!!!!

    4. A look at how 'cutting edge' forensics apparently took down 12 serial killers - each chapter has an overview of both the killers and their crimes, the investigations and what tools were used to break the case, from letter tracing to DNA and from psychological profiling to brain fingerprinting. More like a Channel 5 documentary than an in-depth look, I would have liked a little more depth regarding each investigation - instead of following developments and leads we skipped lightly over the detail [...]

    5. I was very disappointed at how the chapters were organized and without sugarcoating my main pet peeve I'm going to just say it. This book was horribly written. I can't think of a worse way the information could have been presented. Ugh!Did the author even read what she wrote? Did anyone read it to see if what was written made sense? If I were a gambling person, I'd bet "No." Each chapter should have begun with a breakdown of the date and city/country, names of officers involved, names and nickna [...]

    6. This is appropriately named "Devil's Dozen". These serial killers are horrible, devilish individuals. The stories are interesting, and the forensic techniques that have put them away are great. I have an appreciation for the people involved in these tedious investigations their persistence, care, and genuine wish to help the victims and their families is admirable. I'm also very thankful for the ongoing progress in forensic tools that may continue to aid in the prosecution of criminals. Some of [...]

    7. If I could of gave this book Zero stars I would have. I only made It to page 20 or so when the Author made a huge mistake. She wrote that Karla homolka's middle Sister Lori had some how been involved in killing the youngest sister tammy lynn homolka which is completely Untrue!! I figured if the author could make a huge mistake that early on in the book, That there would be other complete fabrications later on. With that being said I do NOT recommend this book. if you want to read a true crime bo [...]

    8. From reviewers:Noelle says:"These stories are better than fiction, so let's hope for some real-life sequels." really????? let's hope for more serial killers to systematically target and attack, rape, and murder primarily women and children so we have some new fun stuff to read? REALLY? way to end your already boring book on such an inexplicably sour note, lady.Karen says:"These stories are better than fiction, so let's hope for some real-life sequels."while I agree that true life crime stories a [...]

    9. This book was mostly a historical summary of 12 serial killer cases. The murders were briefly described as well as how the criminals were ultimately identified and in some cases tried and convicted. I don't think that much described in this book was actually "cutting edge" though some of it might have been at the time. I didn't really learn anything new about forensics, and I don't know that much to begin with. Some of the techniques, esp. DNA testing, were described awkwardly as if by someone w [...]

    10. This book does contain some interesting tidbits of information but some of the cases really seemed to have little to do with the changes that were supposedly linked to them. What really annoyed me about this book was the way the author talked about rape and kept using euphemisms instead of calling a rape a rape, had this book been from the 70s I might not have been that annoyed by it but it's from 2009. I also did not like when referring to a Russian case it was said that after interviewing seve [...]

    11. This book includes capsule reviews of many cases you've read about before but also has a couple I, the True Crime Queen, have never heard about before in my life. Focuses completely on the cutting-edge forensic techniques used to beard serial killers in their lairs. This is my first Katherine Ramsland and I was quite pleased in spite of the fact that most of the cases in here were strictly review for me.

    12. the one thing I liked the most about this book was that the author profiled men I had little or no knowledge of; so it wasn't rehashing the same stuff. I read a review where the writer had stated that the author wished for more material and I was very interested in this, but when I got to it, I didn't read it the same way. I think the author was talking about the forensic technology, that she hoped for continuing break-throughs. That's how I interpreted it.

    13. It was interesting to read about the scientific advances that led to these criminals being caught and there was a decent sized overview of each killer that was mentioned without getting into too much detail. Interesting to read about the Pickton case, as I wasn't aware it was the most expensive case in the world, and of course is still ongoing so therefore the price will be even higher.Overall it wasn't a bad read if you're interested in true crime.

    14. A fascinating book for those interested in the evolution of murder investigation. The book takes 12 cases from around the world and shows how each was a key case in moving investigation methods forward. From handwriting analysis, DNA profiling to analysing computer usage, each case is important in itself for breaking new ground and improving scientific knowlege.Recommended for those interested in crime, forensics or psychology.

    15. Interesting read about individual serial killers. The stories are organized by chapters, and the focus is on the way that they were caught. It was fascinating to read about the determination of investigators over, in some cases, years, to get the perpetrator.Most of the stories have already been rehashed in other books of this type. It would be a good read for fans of true crime or forensics.

    16. Forensics are always evolving and Ms. Ramsland showcases it brilliantly in how new forensic techniques help the police in capturing and prosecuting the criminals. Many are familiar cases (HH Holmes, Dennis Rader, Albert Fish) but some are not (Harvey Robinson, Jack Unterweger). There were some factual errors I saw but all in all an itneresting read

    17. This should have been much more interesting than it was. Unfortunately, it was poorly written and marred by a superficial, sensationalistic approach that would be more appropriate for the tabloids than a book purportedly about forensic science.

    18. I got bored because it was written in a very simplistic manner. Outright LIE about Karla Homolka's sister who was a victim, not a participant in the crimes. Also, when describing H. H. Holmes, way too much attention to a victim named Pitezel and children. H. H. Holmes killed many many more people as a chemist in his "hotel" in Chicago, 1880 world's fair. Didn't even seem like the same person. ugh

    19. The book was interesting and well-written, but I seem to be unable to handle this subject anymore, leaves me morbid inside and depressed.

    20. This non-fiction collection is comprised of cases of serial killers beginning with the nineteenth century through modern times, with a special caveat; all were solved with the most cutting-edge forensics of the day, by detectives that were unrelenting and dogged in their pursuit of the perpetrators of unspeakable crimes. H.H. Holmes (portrayed in "Devil in the White City"), was caught and found guilty with the use of new toxicology research. Andrei Chikatilo (portrayed in the movie "Citizen X" ) [...]

    21. I have read previous reviews of this novel and I have to agree with one of them. The last line of this book isn't the most appropriate for a novel about Serial Killers. This book did a pretty good job in explaining the forensics of the cases and giving a good overview of them. However, I felt like the forensics part of the crimes were just glossed over. I wish there had been more detail about how the police used the science to solve the crime. I wish there had been more of the science of the for [...]

    22. link to original postAs a criminal justice student [who pretty much mended the crack in the bathroom ceiling with her degree], I idolized Ms. Ramsland. She and Ann Rule wrote what amounted to being the various "bibles" I studied when I was in college. As a result, reading this book by Katherine Ramsland delivered a bit of nostalgia to me and also a lot of brain stimulation. 4 out of 5 for one of America's best true crime novelists.

    23. True crime novels are my guilty pleasure reading (guilty pleasure because they usually aren't all that well-written and I feel a bit like I'm slowing down to ogle a car crash when I read them). I'm not all that interested in forensics though, so I probably picked the wrong book. The cases were interesting but I found there was too much discussion of the forensic method for me and not enough detail about the people. I stopped after quite a few of these stories to Google for additional pictures an [...]

    24. Read in preparation for when I finally get my hands on a copy of Dr. Ramsland's book written with Dennis Rader. Unfortunately this leaves me concerned that even that book will be garbage. Some nice, interesting information. A lot of rewriting crime reports. A surprising number of errors ("no room left from reasonable doubt"). Childish prose. Let's hope these issues don't ruin the opportunity she had handed to her.

    25. During the first chapter about H.H. Holmes, I thought the book was alright, and I soldiered on reading it. However, as the book progressed, it wasn't able to capture my attention. The subject matter is interesting, the problem, I think, is the way that it is presented by the author. The details seemed to be everywhere, and sometimes I end up getting confused as to who's who, especially when it came to the detectives and the people they work with.

    26. Recommended only for the buffest of true crime buffs. Ramsland's writing is straightforward and direct, and given the grisliness of some of what she's addressing, it can come across as cold or downright weird. I was hoping this would be more like "Opening Skinner's Box," a comparable anthology style collection of landmark psychological experiments, but it wasn't at all. I admire Ramsland's grasp of information, but this book is pretty boring for being so gruesome.

    27. This is a great encyclopedia of forensics for those who aren't that familiar with what that word means and for every single 'CSI' series fan. Author explains how forensics helped the police to caught 12 of the most well-known serial killers in the world. This books is also a good tool to start your career in crime scene investigation and it is also should be interesting for those people who are interested in serial killers.

    28. Mehdidn't finish. Nothing "cutting edge" revealed, a modest attempt at investigative writing at best. Nothing in-depth and left me feeling like I just watched an episode of "Snapped." Didn't finish, so maybe unfair to post a review, but according to other reviewers the book was disappointing. Moving on.

    29. The Devil's Dozen explores how developments in procedure and forensics led to the capture of twelve serial killers. The stories of each serial killer are interesting in themselves, but the book also is great for learning about how intricate law enforcement can be.The book is well-written and is a very easy read. It will be difficult to put the book down until the reader has finished it.

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