Selected Letters

Selected Letters Edited by Joanne Trautmann Banks With a preface by Hermione Lee The finest and most enjoyable of Virginia Woolf s letters are brought together in a single volume It is a marvellous collection spontane

  • Title: Selected Letters
  • Author: Virginia Woolf Joanne Trautmann Banks Hermione Lee
  • ISBN: 9780099518242
  • Page: 195
  • Format: Paperback
  • Edited by Joanne Trautmann Banks With a preface by Hermione Lee.The finest and most enjoyable of Virginia Woolf s letters are brought together in a single volume It is a marvellous collection spontaneous, witty, often flirtatious and powerfully moving Whether bemoaning some domestic travail, commenting publicly on the state of the nation, or discussing cultural, artisEdited by Joanne Trautmann Banks With a preface by Hermione Lee.The finest and most enjoyable of Virginia Woolf s letters are brought together in a single volume It is a marvellous collection spontaneous, witty, often flirtatious and powerfully moving Whether bemoaning some domestic travail, commenting publicly on the state of the nation, or discussing cultural, artistic or personal concerns, Virginia Woolf is one of the great correspondents This volume displays not only Woolf s courage and brilliance, her generosity and love of gossip, but also her genius for close and enduring friendship.

    • ☆ Selected Letters || ☆ PDF Download by Ë Virginia Woolf Joanne Trautmann Banks Hermione Lee
      195 Virginia Woolf Joanne Trautmann Banks Hermione Lee
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Selected Letters || ☆ PDF Download by Ë Virginia Woolf Joanne Trautmann Banks Hermione Lee
      Posted by:Virginia Woolf Joanne Trautmann Banks Hermione Lee
      Published :2018-05-25T10:51:26+00:00

    1 thought on “Selected Letters”

    1. When I reached the end of the book, I felt an overwhelming sense of despair. No longer would there be another page of clever humour and lovely poetry in prose; I have reached the ultimate end of the book. I also felt rather angry; why should a woman who so strongly championed the oppression of women in her society ever succumb to the oppressing devils in her head? Then again, I know that her life should not - and can not be ever defined by her eleventh hour. Thus, “given her griefs, it is a co [...]

    2. Virginia Woolf was startlingly classist and (sadly, less surprisingly) racist, but so charming, brilliant (and pleasingly aware of it), warmly human. I read this slowly, beginning to end, and felt so upset when I read her last two letters: it was a little like losing a friend.

    3. I drank this book slowly for half a year, and what a book it was.First off, I'd like to say that the many footnotes were crucial to comprehension and very helpful on Joanne Trautman Banks's part, and I thought the letters she chose for this selection were great at serving their purpose of giving us a real picture of Virginia Woolf through her own words.It was interesting getting to know Virginia as a person; I'm a bit sad to have finished the book because it feels like saying goodbye to a good f [...]

    4. “When the Day of Judgment dawns and people, great and small, come marching in to receive their heavenly rewards, the Almighty will gaze upon the mere bookworms and say to Peter, “Look, these need no reward. We have nothing to give them. They have loved reading.”

    5. I've been reading this collection of Virginia Woolf's letters for a long time, usually a letter at a time, and it's brought me close to her. She strikes every kind of note: loving, sharp, acute, desperate, funny, gossipy, bitchy, poetic. nostalgic. In many ways her letters are more readable than her novels because with her novels she was trying too hard, too conscious that she was writing a novel. The book begins with letters she wrote as a child and ends with one of her three suicide notes.I ca [...]

    6. In one of the last letters in this collection, to her friend Ethel Smyth, Virginia Woolf writes, "Thank God, as you would say, one's fathers left one a taste for reading!" This is a book that surely seconds that notion. The letters present nothing less than a portrait of the development of a personality. One comes away from the book with a feeling of almost having known Mrs. Woolf, or, at the very least, wishing one could have known her. For all intents and purposes, letter writing is now a lost [...]

    7. Okay, I never finished it, but it wasn't because of a lack of interest. I don't remember what happened. I had never read someone's letters before. I'll just say it was very cool; how's that? The great thing about this book is that you don't really have to read ALL of it to get something from itbut you'll probably want to. I think I will find this one again and finish it.

    8. Another fascinating insight in the mind of this remarkable woman. The more I read about her the more I wish I could of met her. The letters cover the whole array of human emotions but the last two are particularly heartbreaking.

    9. Superb. Added so much to my understand of the relationship between Virginia Woolf and her sister, Vanessa Bell, the acclaimed Bloomsbury artist. Highly recommend this book!

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