New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603

New Worlds Lost Worlds The Rule of the Tudors No period in British history has resonance and mystery today than the sixteenth century New Worlds Lost Worlds brings the atmosphere and events of this great epoch to life Exploring the underlying re

  • Title: New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603
  • Author: Susan Brigden
  • ISBN: 9780142001257
  • Page: 231
  • Format: Paperback
  • No period in British history has resonance and mystery today than the sixteenth century New Worlds, Lost Worlds brings the atmosphere and events of this great epoch to life Exploring the underlying religious motivations for the savage violence and turbulence of the period from Henry VIII s break with Rome to the overwhelming threat of the Spanish Armada Susan BrigdeNo period in British history has resonance and mystery today than the sixteenth century New Worlds, Lost Worlds brings the atmosphere and events of this great epoch to life Exploring the underlying religious motivations for the savage violence and turbulence of the period from Henry VIII s break with Rome to the overwhelming threat of the Spanish Armada Susan Brigden investigates the actions and influences of such near mythical figures as Elizabeth I, Thomas More, Bloody Mary, and Sir Walter Raleigh Authoritative and accessible, New Worlds, Lost Worlds, the latest in the Penguin History of Britain series, provides a superb introduction to one of the most important, compelling, and intriguing periods in the history of the Western world.

    • Best Download [Susan Brigden] ↠ New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603 || [Philosophy Book] PDF ✓
      231 Susan Brigden
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      Posted by:Susan Brigden
      Published :2019-02-17T01:45:50+00:00

    1 thought on “New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603”

    1. Concentrates a lot of time on religious developments (not unexpected), and on Ireland, which was. I almost felt I needed a scorecard for Ireland, whose history I am less familiar with than English history for this period. Very interesting.

    2. At school, my children have studied the Tudors in Year 1, Year 3, Year 6 and Year 9 and, looking ahead, they will probably turn up in years 11, 12 and 13 too - and that's not to mention Shakespeare in English, The Tudors on TV, Wolf Hall on stage and screen, and hundreds of other books, plays, films, series and shows. In an age of historical ignorance, we are left with 1066, Elizabeth, bluff King Hal and his wives and, er, that's about it. But the problem with all of this is its bittiness - we g [...]

    3. This is a brilliant book - and in glad I'm done. This is a master's level course on history - you had better have already read the textbook. This is the lecture, or sermon, that assumes you have a thorough grasp of the basic historical facts. I do not, so found myself regularly consulting . The author displays a thorough grasp of the late 15th and 16th centuries under the Tudors. Surely everyone has heard of Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth. It's hard to imagine what Britain would be like today if [...]

    4. Pretty uneven- the sections on Ireland were almost impossible to follow, and there was far too much about the endless, pointless court 'politics' of the Tudors. Do you really care to read functional history about Elizabeth's favorites? That stuff's best left to HBO. When Brigden writes about everyday life and religious strife, the book's much more interesting. When she writes about the structures of government at the time, it's not interesting in the same way but I can see those sections as an i [...]

    5. The writing style deserves a single star, but the author impressively integrates quotations from numerous period sources into every paragraph and almost every sentence. Also, the bibliographical essay at the back is valuable for researchers in the Tudor culture.

    6. If you read a lot of history, or even some, you always get to the bibliography at the end of the book--and you are always amazed. Dozens of pages of names of texts, and always in small print. How does the historian do her job? How does she read all those books, and what does she look for when she reads them? Does she take copious notes on every book, and cull out the what she needs? I could just enroll in a M.A or PHD history program, but who has the time, money, and patience to spend your days [...]

    7. This is by far one of the strongest entries in the Penguin History of Britain: it's comparable to Carpenter's Struggle For Mastery, still the best in the series.Brigden's strength is that she manages to integrate the social and political history in a way that moves the historical narrative forward. Too often, a history text will have the political history that's then followed by the cultural and social history in a way that leaves the two feeling disjointed, but Brigden manages to integrate the [...]

    8. I think of this book as my penance for enjoying all the naughty bits in HBO's the Tudors. The book is amazingly dense; I was not surprised to learn that the book is sometimes assigned for college history courses. The author does a great job of creating a conceptual framework of key concepts - the nobility, the English Reformation, how the judicial system evolved, landholding, power of the commons, the contrast of Ireland and Scotland - upon which to hang all the hundreds and hundreds of characte [...]

    9. This is possibly the first history book i have ever read, it was certainly the first i ever enjoyed. Brigden takes the reader on a romp through the lives and impacts of the tudor monarchs. Highly enjoyable and also easy to read, i'd recommend this to anyone who usually finds history too dry for their palate.

    10. Well, I definitely learnt a lot about Ireland and religion as the book focused alot on these topics, which is good because Ireland isn't often discussed when reading about the Tudors unless it's about rebellion. The book provides some nice context and narrative for this time but skipped over important events quite quickly. It was also a little dry.

    11. Pretty good general history of the Tudor period, though I felt that Elizabeth I's reign was given rather more attention and detail than those of the other monarchs. The sections on Ireland seemed interminable

    12. In going over such well-trodden ground, a modern author needs an "angle" -- here Brigden focuses on Elizabeth, religion and Ireland for specialization, which made the book a bit dense, but okay for those in need of "Tudor fix" gratification.

    13. Plenty of information here but I did sometimes find her writing a bit difficult, worth getting some background historical knowledge before diving into this, may be a bit daunting to those new to the history of the Tudor period.

    14. I didn't like this book. Parts of it were interesting but most parts were written so strangely. It seemed incredibly confusing to read at times, it would jump years, etc.

    15. Very well researched, yet written in a very readable style. This book was very interesting and informative.

    16. A strange mix of too much detail then long jumps over what seem like important periods / events. Decent as a survey of the period though, to get a sense of what to read next on the subject.

    17. I've recently had an interest in British monarchies. This was the best book I could find to read, does anyone have a suggestion of one to read? Particularly the Tutor family.

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