Giving Birth

Giving Birth Catherine Taylor a doula birth assistant and mother has written an evocative narrative in which she offers insightful observations of the working lives of midwives and the women who have depended on

  • Title: Giving Birth
  • Author: Catherine Taylor
  • ISBN: 9780399527883
  • Page: 488
  • Format: Paperback
  • Catherine Taylor, a doula birth assistant and mother, has written an evocative narrative in which she offers insightful observations of the working lives of midwives and the women who have depended on their skills and strength to help bring their children into the world This is the perfect companion for parents to be and all professionals who are engaged in and witnessCatherine Taylor, a doula birth assistant and mother, has written an evocative narrative in which she offers insightful observations of the working lives of midwives and the women who have depended on their skills and strength to help bring their children into the world This is the perfect companion for parents to be and all professionals who are engaged in and witness to the miracle of birth One of the most important books on childbirthA colorful, anecdotal, and research supported journey from both the mothers and midwives perspectivesA classic Pam England, nurse midwife and author of Birthing from Within An Extra Ordinary Guide to Childbirth Preparation

    • Best Read [Catherine Taylor] ↠ Giving Birth || [Biography Book] PDF ✓
      488 Catherine Taylor
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Catherine Taylor] ↠ Giving Birth || [Biography Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Catherine Taylor
      Published :2018-09-11T12:05:38+00:00

    1 thought on “Giving Birth”

    1. I'm glad I finished it but amazed I survived the first 100+ pages. Surely this initial section, reflecting on the compromises made by CNMs working in hospital settings, could have been condensed. I wouldn't have minded fewer of these terrible birth stories and the author's predictable commentary on them. Honestly it stressed me out.However, I did enjoy how the book's structure paralleled the author's own journey in dreaming of, conceiving, carrying and delivering her second child, and the tone g [...]

    2. I loved this book. It is well researched, informative and approachable, and well written, with a sense of humor that does not belittle the topic. It was also validating and comforting to read about the options available to women and the experiences of the women in the book. I recommend this to any moms-to-be.

    3. This is one of those books which I wish I would have taken notes throughout, to better enable me to review it accurately. Her tone, her writing style, and the content were all excellent.Her writing style is accessible, honest, frank, and open--the way a good journalist's should be. Her descriptions of the various women she meets, the places she goes, and the births she attends as an observer or doula are vivid without being wordy. I found myself moved to nearly to tears several times (I'm not mu [...]

    4. Taylor follows midwives in a hospital setting, at home births, and at one birthing center, describing births they facilitate and interviewing them about their attitudes toward medicine, women's health care, and childbirth. The research coincides with Taylor's own second pregnancy, so she's also a character trying to figure out her own birth plan as the book goes along. I really appreciated the thorough and seemingly objective depictions of birth throughout this book, and loved Taylor's broad app [...]

    5. It was very eye-opening. In our culture, it seems like birth is one of those things that most people will experience (either directly or through watching) at some point in life, but it's not something we talk about or experience other than our own. I think my entire experience with childbirth before this book was one video in my child development class and that Star Trek episode where Keiko O'Brien gave birth in the Enterprise cafeteria. Neither of them gave a very accurate picture. This book di [...]

    6. Keeping the midwifery dream alive, one book at a time! This is a great book for me to see the reality of what practicing nurse-midwives are up against these days. And it's not pretty. As the demand for nurse-midwives increases, many midwives have been hired in hospitals. They are therefore under the pressures of a hospital administration (seeking to make money) and a power structure (demanding that they practice within the protocols of medical management). How can a midwife balance between the m [...]

    7. I really enjoyed this book. I felt like it was very informative and gave me some insights into my own personal wishes and desires. I thought had plenty of great information, of course, scattered with plenty of opinions. I had a few complaints. One, the writer was pregnant during the researching of this book. I enjoyed reading of her personal experiences but felt like they could have been cut down slightly, as they sometimes seemed to overpower certain parts of the book. Also, there were a very m [...]

    8. Every woman should read this. Pregnancy and birth have become so medicalized, and still, the U.S. has one of the worst maternal mortality rates in the world. This is a fascinating look at midwifery, birth centers, home birth, and their intersections with traditional care, all in the form of a memoir. I didn't want to finish it.

    9. I think this is a great book to read to introduce someone into the world of nurse-midwives, and somewhat into the world of direct-entry or homebirth midwives. It discusses a lot of the reasons people choose midwives, and what options are available, as well as some of the problems with the traditional ob/gyn attended hospital birth. It has some great birth stories, too.

    10. I actually worked at the hospital in Albuquerque with some of the midwives she interviews in the book, and she does a very good job of describing what it's like for them and the clients. Though it was a hospital, working with those midwives changed my whole perspective on what normal birth really is. And the more authors who tell their stories, the better.

    11. This book is written by a pregnant journalist as she researches what type of birth she wants. She shadows and interviews midwives who work in hospitals, birth centers, and who do home births. She combines academic research with her personal desires for her pregnancy and birth. It's an intriguing, interesting, touching read that makes you wonder about the state of maternity care in America.

    12. Loved it, and it happens to have an Ithaca connection, which always makes me happy. The state of birth in this country is positively scary and Taylor knows that, but doesn't hit you over the head with it.

    13. If you want to know about the world of midwives and details of labor and birth, this is an engrossing read. I would recommend it to anyone considering a natural birth.

    14. This was an enjoyable read while also giving a lot of information. It helped me understand the medical system better and the inside perceptive. I also really enjoyed the different birth stories.

    15. It offers a lot of international/political perspective on giving birth, and the author's experience attending a variety of births (midwife in hospital, birthing center, home birth) is valuable.

    16. This book goes into a lot of detail about midwives and nurse midwives in New Mexico. It was pretty good, but I wasn't as enthralled with it as I was with some of the other birth books I read.

    17. This book puts hospital midwives in a kinda bad light, but other than that, it was really interesting.

    18. I really enjoyed reading this one. Some parts were excellent and some parts were a little weird/feminist/mystical for me. Still it was an interesting perspective and gave me lots to think about.

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