Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical

Ayn Rand The Russian Radical Author of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged Ayn Rand is one of the most widely read philosophers of the twentieth century Yet despite the sale of nearly thirty million copies of her work

  • Title: Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical
  • Author: Chris Matthew Sciabarra
  • ISBN: 9780271014418
  • Page: 227
  • Format: Paperback
  • Author of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand 1905 1982 is one of the most widely read philosophers of the twentieth century Yet, despite the sale of nearly thirty million copies of her works, there have been few extended scholarly examinations of her thought Ayn Rand The Russian Radical provides the first comprehensive analysis of the intellectual roots andAuthor of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand 1905 1982 is one of the most widely read philosophers of the twentieth century Yet, despite the sale of nearly thirty million copies of her works, there have been few extended scholarly examinations of her thought Ayn Rand The Russian Radical provides the first comprehensive analysis of the intellectual roots and philosophy of this controversial thinker Chris Sciabarra views Rand s Objectivism as a rejection and affirmation of key elements in the Russian tradition Born in Russia during the Silver Age, Rand was educated at Leningrad University and studied with N O Lossky She absorbed a dialectical method of inquiry that profoundly influenced her literary and philosophic project Her distinctive libertarian synthesis is presented as a major contribution to radical social theory Ultimately, Sciabarra challenges Rand s followers and critics to reassess her thought and its place in intellectual history.

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      Posted by:Chris Matthew Sciabarra
      Published :2019-03-05T19:45:22+00:00

    1 thought on “Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical”

    1. A study of ideas and of great mind in history, and analyze the development of their sense of life and psycho-epistemology; compared to the degree that their ideas and discoveries were (further) developed and implemented by themselves and others.This book is worth reading if you wanted to be expose to a different category of philosophers in different era of our time.

    2. Probably one of the best academic studies of Rand out there. Scibarra takes Rand seriously, and thinks she is a great philosopher. Refreshingly, however, he is not an idol-worshiper like so many objectivists, and his treatment of here is worth of the title of serious intellectual history. He traces Rand's intellectual development to prevalent philosophical trends in Rand's Silver-Age St. Petersburg childhood milieu. He further argues that most of her distinctive claims are based on a dialectical [...]

    3. It's refreshing to see someone address the gap in scholarly assessments of Rand's work. The author's thesis concerns Ayn Rands roots in Russian philosophy and the areas where she agreed with key thinkers that preceded her, often extending to a different conclusion. In particular, there are strong parallels between [return]her ideas and those of Nietzsche and Marx. Her dialectic approach also resembles Hegel. [return]Along the way, the author covers most of Rand's philosophy: the 4 keys, the root [...]

    4. This book has good explanation of Rand's philosophy. Her early education, with Lossky, is highlighted. The effect on her of Nietzche is also noted. The way in which Objectivism updates Aristotle is explained. Those interested in thinking will find a lot here. The author says that Rand believed that "thinking is the essential root of human production and survival." (pg 361) Rand's criticism of education and Dewey's effect thereupon is presented around page 326. Support of Szasz's ideas is noted. [...]

    5. Chris Sciabarra has written an in depth analysis of Ayn Rand’s objectivist philosophy, with a focus on the origins and influences on her intellectual development. This book is only for the die-hard Randite. For one who has not read her fiction and also read representative smattering of her non-fiction, this work is a tough slog. Even with an established knowledge of Rand’s principals this work leans to the dry side. Take a pass on this.

    6. The real low-down on the philosophy of Ayn Rand, and how she came by it. For instance, she owed a lot more debt to Emmanuel Kant than she might have been willing to admit in her own mind. This is not a book for true believers in "objectivism." It shows the weave of her though, as well as its philosophical and historical context. If you want to understand the philosophy of Ayn Rand, and its antecedents, this is the book for you.

    7. If you're interested in Ayn Rand, fucking read this book. The only complaint I have is that Sciabarra completely ignores the countless criticisms of Rand's minarchism.

    8. This book is brilliant. Sciabarra has managed to reverse engineer Objectivism and place it into its proper historical context.

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