Indigo

Indigo Indigo is a shimmering lyrical novel about power and transformation Inspired by Shakespeare s magic play The Tempest prizewinning writer Marina Warner refashions the drama to explore the restless co

  • Title: Indigo
  • Author: Marina Warner
  • ISBN: 9780671701567
  • Page: 125
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Indigo is a shimmering, lyrical novel about power and transformation Inspired by Shakespeare s magic play The Tempest, prizewinning writer Marina Warner refashions the drama to explore the restless conflicts between the inhabitants of a Caribbean island and the English family who settled it From that violent moment in the seventeenth century when the English buccaneer KiIndigo is a shimmering, lyrical novel about power and transformation Inspired by Shakespeare s magic play The Tempest, prizewinning writer Marina Warner refashions the drama to explore the restless conflicts between the inhabitants of a Caribbean island and the English family who settled it From that violent moment in the seventeenth century when the English buccaneer Kit Everard arrives at Enfant Beate, the islanders fate is intertwined, often tragically, with that of the Everards The voices that map the fortunes of those born, raised, or landed on the island pass from the wise woman Sycorax in the past, a healer and a dyer of indigo, to the native nanny Serafine Killebree, who transforms them to fairy tales for the two little Everard girls in London in the 1950s At the center of the modern day story is the relationship between these two young women Xanthe, the golden girl, brash and confident, and Miranda, self conscious and uneasy, who struggles with her Creole inheritance When Xanthe decides they should return to Enfant Beate to restore their fortunes, she binds the family closer to its past and awakens a history marked with passions and portents that takes the two women on very different paths of discovery Sensuous and earthy, humorous and magical, Indigo is a novel of powerful originality and imagination.

    • ✓ Indigo || · PDF Download by á Marina Warner
      125 Marina Warner
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Indigo || · PDF Download by á Marina Warner
      Posted by:Marina Warner
      Published :2018-05-08T08:16:49+00:00

    1 thought on “Indigo”

    1. This is a very literary book, that had me excitedly making notes. I first added it to my TBR when I read Wide Sargasso Sea, inspired by the anticolonial 'writing back' concept. This book writes back to The Tempest, giving voices to Sycorax and 'Caliban', and expanding their world. Warner seeks to allow far more space than Shakespeare to challenge the genocidal storytelling of white supremacy, going beyond outrage (the shocked posture of white guilt) to explore magic and mystery, decentreing whit [...]

    2. I fell in love with this story long before I started reading it. As a history/lit major, Shakespeare fanatic and amateur genealogist, any blurb with the words ‘Tempest,’ ‘blood-lines,’ ‘fairytale’ and ‘colonial scars’ is enough to win me over. As predicted, it turned out to be a very engaging read.Indigo is set in two distinct places in two very different periods of time. The primary narrative tells the story of Miranda: a tiny twig on a complex family tree of once-glorious, red- [...]

    3. Having loved The Tempest, this novel is another breath of fresh air. It is beautifully written, so much detail and seeping with history and knowledge - an absolute delight to read. Loved how you saw characters from the play come into their own, especially Sycorax, who isn't mentioned in detail in the play. Novels like these always help me to deepen my interest for the original text, in this case The Tempest, which is one of if not my favorite play by Shakespeare. Really liked it, awesome stuff.

    4. I was sceptical before reading because of all the negative comments about the story dragging out. I think the book was wonderful, a perfect complement to Fantastic Metamorphosis and From Beast to Blonde and beautifully written. I only wish I'd heard Sycorax speak more, but I suppose that's idealistic. Read this if you're interested in black feminist interpretations of fairy tales (even though this is by a white feminist).

    5. I wanted to like this book because, really, I want to applaud anyone with the ambition to use a Shakespeare play as the starting point for a novel. And this novel starts off well. I found the first half of it to be interesting and engaging, but unfortunately it seemed to lose its way somewhere and I ended up thinking that this is really a 250-page book that's been stretched to nearly 400. The other thing that began to bug me was that it does not really have anything very original to say. If you [...]

    6. Your basic historical novel dealing with colonialism. It seems the book was a bit too ambitious, and it felt very incomplete on two many of the subjects that were introduced.

    7. I don't know whether it is just my language abilities or the way Warner narrates this story but I simply cannot follow the plot. Although I have read The Tempest and know that Indigo is supposed to be a retelling I gave up on this. Yet, I'm open to picking it up again some time.

    8. Potentially this would have been the greatest idea for a novel – ever. Imagine an author explaining the roots of a Jamaican family , while using Shakespeare’s The Tempest as a backdrop. Also now and then there are chapters dedicated to storytelling. Sounds great? Unfortunately in reality this was a mighty disappointing read.The book opens up properly in post war London where two Jamaican immigrant families are coming to grips with their race. We find out in one long interlude that their ance [...]

    9. finished it with an 'is that it?' feeling, though whether the lack was in me or the text i couldn't say. it *did* have that distinct post-colonial didacticism i remember so fondly from my student days, which may be why i couldn't be bothered thinking about it in any depth. some fine passages though.

    10. I didn't like this book. I thought it was very longwinded, as it just went on an on. After 250 pages I gave up reading because it simply didn't seem to stop and I felt I had to really struggle through the novel. Reading just took up too much precious time and eventually I lost interest in the novel.

    11. i found this a little hard to get into & it felt a little clunky with the attempts to create fictitious scenarios & sports that parralleled those things in the real world but that being said, i finally did enjoy the novel. i especially enjoyed the dream like / dreamtime like parts of the book that reflected the island culture. these parts really flowed & captured the imagination

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