Lift: Fitness Culture, From Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja Warriors

Lift Fitness Culture From Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja Warriors A fascinating cultural history of fitness from Greek antiquity to the era of the big box gym and beyond exploring the ways in which human exercise has changed over time and what we can learn from ou

  • Title: Lift: Fitness Culture, From Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja Warriors
  • Author: Daniel Kunitz
  • ISBN: 9780062336200
  • Page: 323
  • Format: ebook
  • A fascinating cultural history of fitness, from Greek antiquity to the era of the big box gym and beyond, exploring the ways in which human exercise has changed over time and what we can learn from our ancestors.We humans have been conditioning our bodies for than 2,500 years, yet it s only recently that treadmills and weight machines have become the gold standard oA fascinating cultural history of fitness, from Greek antiquity to the era of the big box gym and beyond, exploring the ways in which human exercise has changed over time and what we can learn from our ancestors.We humans have been conditioning our bodies for than 2,500 years, yet it s only recently that treadmills and weight machines have become the gold standard of fitness For all this new technology, are we really healthier, stronger, and flexible than our ancestors Where Born to Run began with an aching foot, Lift begins with a broken gym system one founded on high tech machinery and isolation techniques that aren t necessarily as productive as we think Looking to the past for context, Daniel Kunitz crafts an insightful cultural history of the human drive for exercise, concluding that we need to get back to basics to be truly healthy.Lift takes us on an enlightening tour through time, beginning with the ancient Greeks, who made a cult of the human body the word gymnasium derives from the Greek word for naked and following Roman legions, medieval knights, Persian pahlevans, and eighteenth century German gymnasts Kunitz discovers the seeds of the modern gym in nineteenth century Paris, where weight lifting machines were first employed, and takes us all the way up to the game changer the feminist movement of the 1960s, which popularized aerobics and calisthenics classes This ignited the first true global fitness revolution, and Kunitz explores how it brought us to where we are today.Once a fast food inhaler and substance abuser, Kunitz reveals his own decade long journey to becoming ultra fit using ancient principals of strengthening and conditioning With Lift, he argues that, as a culture, we are finally returning to this natural ideal and that it s to our great benefit to do so.

    • Best Read [Daniel Kunitz] ↠ Lift: Fitness Culture, From Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja Warriors || [Humor and Comedy Book] PDF Ï
      323 Daniel Kunitz
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Daniel Kunitz] ↠ Lift: Fitness Culture, From Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja Warriors || [Humor and Comedy Book] PDF Ï
      Posted by:Daniel Kunitz
      Published :2018-06-01T06:23:20+00:00

    1 thought on “Lift: Fitness Culture, From Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja Warriors”

    1. I found this book fascinating and extremely boring all at once. It's an extensive history of fitness culture and Kunitz cites at least 100 references at the back of the book so it's well researched. I did take away a lot of new knowledge and appreciation for fitness and exercise. For instance, strenuous exercise of any kind was advised against BY doctors until as late as the 1970s! Kunitz made it obvious that he's a huge fan of CrossFit, which has garnered a lot of criticism and totally clouded [...]

    2. The basic formula the book follows is:1: Heres some weird things we used to think about fitness. 2: Heres what we know now. 3: That's why Cross-Fit is the best. (Repeat)Some of the history parts were very interesting, but it did get a bit tedious at times.

    3. I LOVED this.I am a crossfitter, though I would say that my kool-aid is a little watered down.This dude eats buckets of the powder by itself. As much as I love crossfit, it would probably seem a little biased to that to people who are not crossfitters.Otherwise, it was super interesting, tracking the history of exercise, our preoccupation of people to exercise as a means of changing our bodies and a shift to an emphasis on performance. I also really liked his theories on feminism as it relates t [...]

    4. 3.5 Here's what I liked about this book. Kunitz is a former Paris Review Editor so he writes well and includes a great story about George Plimpton and the early days of his quest or non-quest for fitness. I wish there was more personal narrative like that to balance the exhaustive history of fitness. The book is well-researched but tends to get a bit dry in places. This is timely chronicle with the Olympics coming up. The history is interesting and relevant. Kunitz more than shows his mind body [...]

    5. If you've ever wondered what black lagoon that CrossFit crawled out of or who started Muscle Beach or whether the Greeks really did practice sports in the nude, then "Lift" is for you. Kunitz melds personal experience and research into an easy nonfiction read. Although he tends to praise CrossFit perhaps too much, the chapters about antiquity, functional fitness, and bodyweight exercises illuminate facts I--a bit of a fitness freak--had never thought to ask about (such as where the name "jumping [...]

    6. You know that person at work who can't stop talking about CrossFit? Give them this book, on the condition they never talk about it with you again. I was really looking forward to the history of exercise, but couldn't get past the author's love of CrossFit (it's New Frontier Fitness!) and personal philosophy about exercise. I loved a book about the history of curry and loved it, and couldn't finish this.

    7. Spoiler alert: This guy really likes Crossfit! I've never done crossfit and so after this book I'm curious to join in a session or two, but Daniel Kunitz is a Crossfit evangelist through and through. I didn't mind that too much though.Some really interesting parts about Greek fitness as a part of a ancient arete and workout culture evolving in the US during the 20th century. Fun fact: "Gym" means "naked" in Greek. The Greeks had a sand-filled gymnasium area in the courtyard where Plato studied u [...]

    8. There is a lot of interesting information in this book though it does get dry at times. I particularly liked learning about the intersection of feminism and fitness culture, that was new to me.

    9. First, a disclosure: I don't practice cross-fit - I didn't realize that the book was inadvertently about cross-fit. I've read a lot of opinions about it over the years and have observed people doing it and watched a documentary.This book started out good and was for the most part pretty good until the final chapter. The book doesn't explicitly present itself as pro Cross-fit rhetoric, but it is. First, the good thing is that the historical information is very interesting and I had some ah-ha mom [...]

    10. The title of this book probably shouldn't have been "Lift." Rather, it should have been something like: "New Frontier Fitness: Everyone Should Do CrossFit" or "New Frontier Fitness: The Historical Culmination of the Human Quest for Greatness." I thought I was going to read a book on how physical activity and exercise had been approached by various civilizations over the ages - and something like that is definitely present in this book. But there's also an awful lot about how New Frontier Fitness [...]

    11. Fascinating Look at Fitness A must read just for the historical aspects of fitness and exercise alone! Fascinating to read that the women's lib movement of the 60s and 70s was instrumental in the fitness boom of the 80s and beyond. Using this book for research into my own book being self-published in 2018.

    12. A must read just for the historical aspects of fitness and exercise alone! Fascinating to read that the women's lib movement of the 60s and 70s was instrumental in the fitness boom of the 80s and beyond. Using this book for research into my own fitness book being self-published in 2018.

    13. If you have ever wondered what is fitness? Why are Crossfitters crazy? Why do some many people run? This is an excellent book to answer those questions and more.

    14. There's some good stuff here, but an odd structure to the book. I would have preferred a little more linear history, rather than a constant return/comparison to Crossfit.

    15. 5 stars for the historical research and presentation.1 star for the incessant praise of Crossfit. Also, I'm not a fan of the phrase, "New Frontier Fitness".Balance it all out at 3 stars.

    16. most of this could be found anywhere else, but that last, fulsome crossfit section--that glassman hagiography--was too much for me. blegh

    17. I received a copy of this book through a giveaway on .I didn't really know what to expect from Daniel Kunitz's Lift: Fitness Culture, From Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja Warriors. As implied by the name, this is a bit of an overview of the history of fitness and the cultural perceptions of fitness bounded more or less by the time of written human history. It focuses heavily on specific shifts in the cultural perceptions, and many major shifts in those perceptions happen to hav [...]

    18. So in terms of my personal appreciation for the existence and my reading of the book as a learning experience - 4. Stepping back from my reading, I definitely understand and agree with the criticisms of other reviews on the overrepresentation of CrossFit, so in terms of others' reading interests - 3. The book travels somewhat chronologically through history and arrives at the present with only CrossFit on the table, which is certainly a misrepresentation of today's fitness world. I wouldn't have [...]

    19. I received this book from a giveaway and I really enjoyed it.The author certainly did his research on the history of fitness. I really enjoyed the in-depth looks at how people exercise, especially in recent history. The best parts of the book, however, are when he goes out in the field and discusses modern views of fitness with current experts. Having heard a lot about Crossfit recently (and wondering what all the hype was about), I found his opinions on new fitness crazes very interesting and [...]

    20. Thoroughly researched with a fascinating history of fitness culture throughout the ages and how the newest crossfit fitness trend fits into our continued desire to improve ourselves on more than just an aesthetic level.

    21. This book was ok. I found it interesting enough to finish, but I did skim quite a bit of it. Some of the history seemed pretty repetitive. I guess I just expected it to be more of the author's story as he found his journey to fitness, but it really was a lot of history. In the end I felt like it was a big advertisement for CrossFit - which is great, just different from what I expected. I can't say I would recommend it unless you really want to know the history of exercise.

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