Forty-Seven Days: How Pershing's Warriors Came of Age to Defeat the German Army in World War I

Forty Seven Days How Pershing s Warriors Came of Age to Defeat the German Army in World War I The gripping account of the U S First Army s astonishing triumph over the Germans in America s bloodiest battle of the First World War the Battle of the Meuse Argonne The Battle of the Meuse Argonne s

  • Title: Forty-Seven Days: How Pershing's Warriors Came of Age to Defeat the German Army in World War I
  • Author: Mitchell A. Yockelson
  • ISBN: 9780451466952
  • Page: 174
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The gripping account of the U.S First Army s astonishing triumph over the Germans in America s bloodiest battle of the First World War the Battle of the Meuse Argonne.The Battle of the Meuse Argonne stands as the deadliest clash in American history More than a million untested American soldiers went up against a better trained and experienced German army, costing tThe gripping account of the U.S First Army s astonishing triumph over the Germans in America s bloodiest battle of the First World War the Battle of the Meuse Argonne.The Battle of the Meuse Argonne stands as the deadliest clash in American history More than a million untested American soldiers went up against a better trained and experienced German army, costing twenty six thousand deaths and leaving nearly a hundred thousand wounded Yet in forty seven days of intense combat, those Americans pushed back the enemy and forced the Germans to surrender, bringing the First World War to an end a feat the British and the French had not achieved after than three years of fighting.In Forty Seven Days, historian Mitchell Yockelson tells how General John J Black Jack Pershing s exemplary leadership led to the unlikeliest of victories Appointed commander of the American Expeditionary Forces by President Wilson, Pershing personally took command of the U.S First Army until supplies ran low and the fighting ground to a stalemate Refusing to admit defeat, Pershing stepped aside and placed gutsy Lieutenant General Hunter Liggett in charge While Pershing retained command, Liggett reorganized his new unit, resting and resupplying his men, while instilling a confidence in the doughboys that drove them out of the trenches and across no man s land.Also explored are a cast of remarkable individuals, including America s original fighter ace, Eddie Rickenbacker Corporal Alvin York, a pacifist who nevertheless single handedly killed than twenty Germans and captured 132 artillery officer and future president Harry S Truman innovative tank commander George S Patton and Douglas MacArthur, the Great War s most decorated soldier, who would command the American army in the Pacific War and in Korea Offering an abundance of new details and insight, Forty Seven Days is the definitive account of the First Army s hard fought victory in World War I and the revealing tale of how our military came of age in its most devastating battle.

    • Best Read [Mitchell A. Yockelson] ↠ Forty-Seven Days: How Pershing's Warriors Came of Age to Defeat the German Army in World War I || [Biography Book] PDF ↠
      174 Mitchell A. Yockelson
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Mitchell A. Yockelson] ↠ Forty-Seven Days: How Pershing's Warriors Came of Age to Defeat the German Army in World War I || [Biography Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Mitchell A. Yockelson
      Published :2018-08-18T18:20:59+00:00

    1 thought on “Forty-Seven Days: How Pershing's Warriors Came of Age to Defeat the German Army in World War I”

    1. “Forty-Seven Days” by Mitchell Yockelson is a World War I account of General Pershing and his top commanders during the Meuse Argonne phase from September 26, 1918 to November 11, 1918. In France along the Western Front the American Expeditionary Forces pushed the Germans back with each battle. Pershing was results oriented and his American divisions did not disappoint him. Detailed plans and logistics assisted the warriors on the ground and the aviators in the sky above and with momentum an [...]

    2. This book offers a good, comprehensive account of the Battle of the Meuse-Argonne in which an independent American Army (under the overall command of General John J. Pershing) took part in a key campaign that helped to hasten the end of the First World War.

    3. This is good popular WWI history, written by a professional archivist and historian, using a dramatic framing device and well-known names to illustrate the dramatic insertion of the American military into the war. By tracking the lives of Truman, Rickenbacker, York and the pair of future generals Patton and McArthur, Yockelson gives readers some familiar faces to follow while explaining how the war developed into the Battle of the Meuse-Argonne. There's nothing here that would be new to a milita [...]

    4. The Meuse-Argonne Offensive was a huge affair, and as we draw closer to the 100th anniversary of that event we are seeing a spate of books pop up on the subject. This is a good thing, as the battle – the bloodiest America has ever fought; we lost an average of 550 KIA a day for each of the 47 days of the battle, and times three wounded – has been ignored by most historians for far too long. And though Lengal’s fantastic work, ‘To Conquer Hell’, is arguably the first ‘modern’ book t [...]

    5. On November 11, 1918, the armistice between the Allied and German governments was declared. All fighting stopped and peace was proclaimed. But the preceding 6 weeks had hardly been quiet. The battles in the Meuse-Argonne and St Mihiel kept the war going. It is this six week period that author Mitchell Yockelson covers in his new book, "Forty-seven Days: How Pershing's Warriors Came of Age to Defeat the Germans". Like many recent books about WW1, Yockelson takes a small period of time and covers [...]

    6. A decent-enough account of the Meuse-Argonne offensive. Makes the grandiose claim that this offensive above all the others in the "Hundred Days" commanded German attention and drove the decision to seek an armistice, but really doesn't back it up besides proffering a few quotes from Hindenburg and others, all of whom after the war clearly had incentives to blame defeat on the inexhaustible supply of Americans and not the superior operational performance of the Allied armies (particularly the BEF [...]

    7. One outstanding read from Mitchell Yockelson. The "Green" American troops led by General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing came of age in this very detailed and descriptive account. Another sequel to David v Goliath, how our First Army overcame tremendous odds to squelch the more seasoned and battle tuned Germans. Incredible story with the insight into the Meuse-Argonne the bloodiest clash in American History will captivate any reader. The personalities are here with Black Jack, Hunter Liggett, Doug [...]

    8. An excellent book and thoroughly enjoyed reading it. This book is about the Battle of the Meuse-Argonne which the American soldiers fought the German Army in the final months of World War I. In the book certain men were mentioned that led the American troops in battle such as General John "Black Jack" Pershing and two men who later became generals during World War II: General George S. Patton Jr and General Douglas MacArthur. This also tells of Major Charles Whittlesey who led the men of the 77t [...]

    9. My knowledge of WW I in general and the US role in particular has always been lacking. This is a good place to start, even though it begins at the end (from the end of September to November 11). Yockelson draws a clear picture of how the American army turned the fortunes of war for the allies in 1918. It focuses on the battle of the Meuse-Argonnne and tells the story of how Pershing's army grew up into a war machine capable of taking the battle to the enemy everywhere. It brings the horror of Wo [...]

    10. I found this book to be a fast read that made me want to keep turning pages. It was well written and very informative. It provided a great perspective on America's role in the first world war. After reading this I have a much more thorough understanding of how the tide chart in the last months of the great war. I will look for more things by this author to read.

    11. An inaccurate title. This book only took 46 days for me to read. (Seriously, 46 days.)World War 1 is hard to place into a followable narrative. Even at this level, the final 47 days in which the AEF conducted the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives, various stories at various levels with various units and people become hard to follow. Units appear and disappear out of nowhere. What this book needed was a bit more length to get some of those details in there. It also needed many more maps to [...]

    12. A really interesting description of the US involvement in WW I. Lots of battle detail - one might say too much, but this is what the book is about, so I don't think it is too much. Lots of information about General Pershing. During parts of the book I felt like I was in the opening battle scene of the movie Saving Private Ryan. I gained a depth of understanding of WW I that I did not have before.I liked the little side stories about particular aspects of the war effort, like the information abou [...]

    13. The story of the American entry into World War I. Pershing , Lajuene, Rickenbacker, names I have heard and knew tiny bits and pieces about. This tale tells of their great deeds. A very good read.

    14. Readable and good overview of the Meuse-Argonne battle without bogging down in excessive detail regarding troop/unit movements.

    15. had awaited the arrival of the horde of Americans to reinforce them to end the war, by overwhelming German forces with the large number of new troops. The story of the AEF's role and its leader, Black Jack Pershing, is the centerpiece of this work.To provide context, we learn of Pershing's background and his rise in the army. He took charge of the Mexican expedition just before the First World War. The early portions of the book also speak to the slow pressures leading the United States into the [...]

    16. From New Book Network: "National Archives historian and forensic archivist Mitchell Yockelson reappraises the American Expeditionary Force’s performance under the command of General John J. Pershing. Accordingly, the American forces’ combat experience in the September to November 1918 Meuse-Argonne Campaign is shown to be far more pivotal to Allied victory than allowed for in the standard Anglo-centric literature of the conflict. Even as Pershing’s army acquired its craft in hard fighting [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *