The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics

The Radical and the Republican Frederick Douglass Abraham Lincoln and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics My husband considered you a dear friend Mary Todd Lincoln wrote to Frederick Douglass in the weeks after Lincoln s assassination The frontier lawyer and the former slave the cautious politician and

  • Title: The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics
  • Author: James Oakes
  • ISBN: 9780393330656
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Paperback
  • My husband considered you a dear friend, Mary Todd Lincoln wrote to Frederick Douglass in the weeks after Lincoln s assassination The frontier lawyer and the former slave, the cautious politician and the fiery reformer, the President and the most famous black man in America their lives traced different paths that finally met in the bloody landscape of secession, Civil W My husband considered you a dear friend, Mary Todd Lincoln wrote to Frederick Douglass in the weeks after Lincoln s assassination The frontier lawyer and the former slave, the cautious politician and the fiery reformer, the President and the most famous black man in America their lives traced different paths that finally met in the bloody landscape of secession, Civil War, and emancipation Opponents at first, they gradually became allies, each influenced by and attracted to the other Their three meetings in the White House signaled a profound shift in the direction of the Civil War, and in the fate of the United States.James Oakes has written a masterful narrative history, bringing two iconic figures to life and shedding new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality in Civil War America.

    • [PDF] Download â The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics | by ☆ James Oakes
      144 James Oakes
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download â The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics | by ☆ James Oakes
      Posted by:James Oakes
      Published :2018-09-01T11:17:31+00:00

    1 thought on “The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics”

    1. This book traces the parallel careers of Lincoln and Douglass. Lincoln came from poverty: a self-made, self-educated man. Although he had always hated slavery, he was a politician and a consummate one at that. He proceeded carefully toward his goals, always making sure his constituents were with him. Douglass also came from poverty. Born into slavery, he eventually escaped. He taught himself to read and write and became one of the most eloquent and sought after speakers in America. He began work [...]

    2. The Politician And The ReformerAbraham Lincoln (1809 --1865) and Frederick Douglass (1818 -- 1895)are American heroes with each exemplifying a unique aspect of the American spirit. In his recent study, "The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics" (2007), Professor James Oakes traces the intersecting careers of both men, pointing out their initial differences and how their goals and visions ultimately converged. Oakes is Graduate S [...]

    3. This is a brilliant book. It examines how Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln viewed events with special emphasis on the period from the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act until Lincoln's assassination. Oakes uses the categories of "radical" and "statesman" to explain their approach to the issues--analytical devices that Douglass himself used when speaking at the unveiling of the Lincoln and the Freedman statue in Lincoln Park in Washington, D.C. in 1876. Using the term "radical," Oakes expla [...]

    4. A reasonable compilation of accounts of early encounters, and some attempt to put them in context of each group’s perspective. Decent but not stellar narrative.

    5. A very good read, if sometimes a bit longish. But not tedious. This is a detailed chronology of the intellectual thinking and relationship of Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln over time. It follows the many shifts that Douglass made and the maneuvering of Lincoln during the difficult period of his presidency.It is informative as an academic work. It is interesting and timely. I enjoyed it a lot.

    6. On Douglass, Oakes looks at how he moved from radical to politician throughout his life, including wedding himself so much to the GOP in his last years that he apparently never entertained the idea of a "Free Vote Party" paralleling the Liberty Party of his younger days.No, it's not a full bio, but it leads to further questions. Was this the "settling" of an old man? Was it an evolving pragmatism? Did getting a patronage job bank his inner fires?On Lincoln, Oakes takes a careful look at the long [...]

    7. James Oakes’ The Radical and the Republican turns on the symbolic meaning of the Constitution. In this popular history Oakes seeks to illustrate how abolitionist idealism and practical politics came together in the Civil War era Republican Party, personified respectively by Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. Oakes traces Douglass’s trajectory away from the absolutism of Garrison and toward the large, though less principled, political alliances through which government power is wielded. [...]

    8. I do not normally like the "comparative approach", usually because the chosen subjects of such comparative work are too random and arbitrary to actually prove anything significant. This book succeeds were others have failed precisely because the persons being considered are so alike and yet so different. Abraham Lincoln was a white lawyer politician, while Frederick Douglass was a black reformer and orator. The one was the Republican, the other was the radical. Yet as their careers progressed Li [...]

    9. This is not a dual biography of Lincoln and Douglass, but an explanation of each men's understanding of the causes, goals, and means to reach those goals of the Civil War. During the first few years of the War Frederick Douglass was often very hostile toward Abraham Lincoln's war policies. Much of the difference between the two men lay in their respective positions. Douglass was a reformer, who would never compromise his position. Lincoln was a politician who had to consider public opinion. Thou [...]

    10. The tension between these two figures adds edge to familiar Civil War era. You understand slow pace of emancipation, and the how the politics of antislavery likewise evolve at a crawl. Lincoln's art of the possible -- Lincoln positioning himself as defender of the union -- takes the country in baby steps to abolition. Douglass recruits black scouts to roam the south and tell plantation slaves of Emancipation Proclamation, when Lincoln informs him the "slaves are not coming so rpaidly and so nume [...]

    11. If your knowledge of the political life of Frederick Douglass ends with his Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, I highly recommend you pick this up. It traces the thought evolution of Douglass from an apolitical radical. It contrasts this with Abraham Lincoln's masterful politics in finding compromises between the various pro- and anti-slavery factions in the North, the South, and even within his own Republican Party.

    12. There was too little interaction between Lincoln and Douglass to fill an entire book (though what little there was makes for interesting reading), so much of this book is about how Douglass's views of Lincoln evolved between 1861 and 1864. I was half-way through this book when I realized that the author, James Oakes, was my college history professor in a class I took at Northwestern way back in 1989.

    13. I read this book for my American History class, and while I cannot say that reading it was an enjoyable process, Oakes does make an effort to make the transfer of information interesting. Would I have read this if I did not have to? No. Did I learn something interesting? Yes. The side by side comparison of Lincoln and Douglass makes for some pretty good parallels and was infinitely useful in understanding the effects of the one on the other.

    14. This book provides an excellent overview of some of the lesser known inner workings of Lincoln's mind and government during the time of the Civil War. The few brief interactions between Frederick Douglass and Lincoln give a clear insight into the differences, similarities, and developing friendship of the two influential men.

    15. Great book about Frederick Douglass the radical and Abraham Lincoln's views on slavery came together. It shows that sometimes you need the outside agitators and the gradualist reformist politicians to accomplish a common good. As the author says, these are two of the greatest Americans of the 19th Century.

    16. Actually quite good, if a bit repetitive and in some place contradictory. Oakes clearly lays out Lincoln's longstanding opposition to slavery, as opposed to his abolition-by-convenience reputation. Frederick Douglass gets a fair treatment as well and its interesting to see his political development a well.

    17. the author was a bit repetitive and he was slow to draw parallels that were obvious. Also, I felt like I was reading someone's term paper rather then a book. I ended this feeling unsatisfied and bereft of a message. Not great.

    18. This was a great book about two of my historical heroes. It was interesting to see the slow friendship between the two develop and how radical and mainstream politics can work together with the right leaders.

    19. I picked up this book this afternoon. Looks interesting and is an opportunity to understand the slavery issue at a deeper level. I've always wanted to know more about Frederick Douglass - this should be a good opportunity.

    20. I read this after Team of Rivals and was excited for the possibility of delving deeper into Douglass / Lincoln, but thought that the book portrayed Lincoln in too positive a light in terms of his anti-slavery positions and actions.

    21. Solid writing and research, though the author barely developed his "politicians and reformers work differently" thesis.

    22. An intimate and facinating story of these two historical figures. Also, and accidental yet haunting foreshadowing of the current environment of pro life politics.

    23. During a spirited debate about Lincoln's true reason's for freeing the slaves, I thought it would be nice to know what Frederick Douglass's answer would be. James Oakes has provided the answer.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *