The State of Play: Creators and Critics on Video Game Culture

The State of Play Creators and Critics on Video Game Culture FEATURING IAN BOGOST LEIGH ALEXANDER ZOE QUINN ANITA SARKEESIAN KATHERINE CROSS IAN SHANAHAN ANNA ANTHROPY EVAN NARCISSE HUSSEIN IBRAHIM CARA ELLISON BRENDAN KEOGH DAN GOLDING DAVID JOHNSTON WILLIAM K

  • Title: The State of Play: Creators and Critics on Video Game Culture
  • Author: Daniel Goldberg Linus Larsson Hussein Ibrahim CaraEllison Brendan Keogh DanGolding DavidJohnston William Knoblauch
  • ISBN: 9781609806392
  • Page: 373
  • Format: Hardcover
  • FEATURING IAN BOGOST LEIGH ALEXANDER ZOE QUINN ANITA SARKEESIAN KATHERINE CROSS IAN SHANAHAN ANNA ANTHROPY EVAN NARCISSE HUSSEIN IBRAHIM CARA ELLISON BRENDAN KEOGH DAN GOLDING DAVID JOHNSTON WILLIAM KNOBLAUCH MERRITT KOPAS OLA WIKANDERThe State of Play is a call to consider the high stakes of video game culture and how our digital andFEATURING IAN BOGOST LEIGH ALEXANDER ZOE QUINN ANITA SARKEESIAN KATHERINE CROSS IAN SHANAHAN ANNA ANTHROPY EVAN NARCISSE HUSSEIN IBRAHIM CARA ELLISON BRENDAN KEOGH DAN GOLDING DAVID JOHNSTON WILLIAM KNOBLAUCH MERRITT KOPAS OLA WIKANDERThe State of Play is a call to consider the high stakes of video game culture and how our digital and real lives collide Here, video games are not hobbies or pure recreation they are vehicles for art, sex, and race and class politics.The sixteen contributors are entrenched they are the video game creators themselves, media critics, and Internet celebrities They share one thing they are all players at heart, handpicked to form a superstar roster by Daniel Goldberg and Linus Larsson, the authors of the bestselling Minecraft The Unlikely Tale of Markus Notch Persson and the Game that Changed Everything.The State of Play is essential reading for anyone interested in what may well be the defining form of cultural expression of our time.

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      Posted by:Daniel Goldberg Linus Larsson Hussein Ibrahim CaraEllison Brendan Keogh DanGolding DavidJohnston William Knoblauch
      Published :2018-06-12T01:44:37+00:00

    1 thought on “The State of Play: Creators and Critics on Video Game Culture”

    1. This is a collection of essays from various gamers, game critics, and game makers – sometimes, all three – on the state of gaming as a worldwide hobby today, the culture of it, and the community surrounding it. First off, let me praise the premise of this book. I’m a lifelong gamer myself, from that Millennial generation that is the first to never remember a time without computer games. I’ve had my hands on the controls since I was a tot, and it’s a passion that for me has only grown a [...]

    2. This is an incredibly uneven collection. 4 stars because I'm glad it exists; also because the pieces that are worth reading are EXTREMELY worth reading, and some of the not-so-great essays still presents valuable thoughts & ideas. Several of the pieces collected here, however, suffer from sounding much more like internet rants than actual essays, with a strange mixture of over- and under-explanation of ideas. Highlights include Leigh Alexander's lovely lyrical piece about the magic of games [...]

    3. State of Play is a collection of a bunch of different essays from notable video game and culture critics, such as Anita Sarkeesian, Ian Bogost, Zoe Quinn, and a handful more. Ultimately, I feel that this collection does a really nice job addressing a variety of issues that video game culture is faced with: blatant sexism, racism, and questions about the reality of being "a gamer".Perhaps the most INTRIGUING essay, however, has nothing to do with the above topics. Rather, it wrestles with depicti [...]

    4. I played video games growing up and I'll say this: Books like this need to be more of a thing in the industry. Goldberg and Larsson curated some of the most prominent voices in games criticism from Anita Sarkeesian and Katherine Cross to Zoe Quinn, Ian Bogost, Evan Narcisse, and others featured here in The State of Play. I was really pleased that the editors included an excerpt from Leigh Alexander's memoir, Breathing Machine, as she is one of my favorite people in the field, writing excellent a [...]

    5. While State of Play purports to be an examination of "video game culture," to a far greater extent its essays are about the contributors themselves. It's largely an unfortunate assortment of self-congratulation, self-pity, and self-promotion, with video games being discussed mostly in the context of the authors' insecurities and personal preferences. There's a lot of rhetoric and a cavalcade of broad claims that go unsourced, the net effect of which is a book that reads like a series of excerpts [...]

    6. As a video game enthusiast and recent presenter at a gender and women's studies class, the chapters of this book that deal with the subject matter are dead on and enlightening. If you don't approach these essays with an open mind you will miss the point of the narrarive: gamers or players are more than boys and 18 to 35 year old men.This compendium serves as an excellent source of material to discuss the current problems with video games as they related to moder culture. Be prepared to read the [...]

    7. A book on videogame culture for people outside the domain. We could say that it serves as a good entry point for people trying to understand the game scene, mainly not games but its actors, the culture creators, with their worries and concerns.To be clear the book is more like a curated set of texts, previously written by the authors, and invited by Goldberg to be part of this book. Some of these texts can be found online, in blog posts or personal websites, which justifies the lack of depth in [...]

    8. I have mixed feelings about this volume. First, it's a pretty good primer on essays on games and culture (though not academic). Second, it feels like I've read most of these online before and I feel a bit put out because I expected this to be an edited volume of new contributions. So feeling 1 makes me positive and feeling 2 makes me negative, which nets the whole thing about 2-3 stars and really, it's a decent compilation in hard copy so it can sit nicely at 3 stars. I wouldn't bother buying an [...]

    9. I've read it out of curiosity, as a way to get to know what is happening in the video game culture outside what the traditional media tells us. These 16 contributors all have given their opinions on different subjects; some of them are looking back to the 2014 GamerGate and all the hate it had relased on women. Worth reading for those curious about the main cultural issues in video games. These main issues are: sex, religion, war, racism, sexism and design.

    10. Como toda recopilación de varios autores, contiene piezas muy buenas y algunas no tanto. Da un panorama muy amplio de los temas que no se exploran comúnmente en los videojuegos y de las personas que los valoramos, es muy interesante.

    11. 1) "More than any other form of creative expression, video games are highly dependent on, and to a certain extent an offshoot of, advances in computing and digital technology. This means games have traditionally been engaged with and discussed as products of technology rather than products of culture, which is why most game criticism still tends to read a lot like a review of a mobile phone or a car. []Video game production has historically been prohibitively expensive and time-consuming, giving [...]

    12. This book is almost like a brother to me. I love it and hate it simultaneously. I am glad it exists, but it isn't perfect.As with most anthologies, it has a fair share of trash and treasure, and It is up to you to decide which essays are which; nevertheless, I enjoyed the first few essays, as they offer experiences relatable to a gamer like myself. However, many of the essays that followed were overly liberal for my tastes, featuring topics such as race, gender, sexual orientation, etc.Overall, [...]

    13. As a non-gamer, I was enthralled by the 14 essays in this book, that explored and discussed various issues of gaming entertainment, such as race, gender, violence, death, sex and fantasy. It raised points that I'll be thinking about for quite awhile.

    14. This is a really great series of essays on games. Some are better than others, but there's something great in here for every game enthusiast to learn from, I'm sure.

    15. The best way of reviewing a book such as this is to state at the outset that the authors of its various essays are writing for an openly and avowedly “progressive” audience. This book is not writing to an audience of anyone who would remotely be considered a decent or moral or upstanding person by any godly standard. Nor is this game meant for those who are fundamentally mainstream in their cultural focus. No, this book is written by and for people on the far leftist end of the political spe [...]

    16. I gave this book five stars because although I stumbled a little at the beginning, the book is such a comprehensive snapshot of gaming today, whether you're invested heart and soul into it or whether you'd like to inhabit a different planet from it entirely. The thing is that video games are here to stay and not only that, video games are now heavily mainstream. The perception of an isolated niche enjoyment has and should be broken as well as its isolation as a straight white cis male-only club. [...]

    17. A solid collection of essays exploring various aspects of videogame culture (as it says in the title). This came out in 2015, in the immediate wake of the Gamergate shitshow, and that's reflected in a good chunk of the chapters exploring online abuse and the homogeneous white supremacy of "gamer" identity. Dan Golding's chapter on the cultivation of "the Gamer" is particularly strong. This is far from the only topic though: merritt kopas has a great piece on sex and sexuality in games; Hussein I [...]

    18. The State of Play is not the type of book I would normally pick up. Although it's anthropological in purpose, I think, which I like, it's a collection of (mostly) essays about video games, both historically and in current times. As a video game watcher (when my husband or son are playing) but not a video game player, I wasn't certain that I would enjoy the level of analysis this book strove to meet.However, all told, I feel like I'm a better person for having read it. First, the essays deepened [...]

    19. A nice collection of essays by some of the most prominent voices in the field. Some of these essays are revised and republished from online versions (and it was, in fact, the revised Dan Golding essay that I acquired the book to read). The collection hits the major notes in videogame criticism: Why games are good, online identity, form, race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and violence. But some of the essays are surprising--Knoblauch's essay on the history of the apocalypse in gaming (and other [...]

    20. A decent collection of essays attempting to map the current critical landscape of games criticism. This is probably an impossible task, given the current variety of voices and fast rate of change. And as such, the collection can rather seem a bit disjointed, swinging all the way from literal personal memoir to academic essays with 30+ footnotes. Some of the essays are less about games and more about the conversation and culture surrounding them (and at least one feels like an ad for the author's [...]

    21. This is a great primer for those interested in what video games can mean to us culturally. The anthology is well curated, with essays covering violence, religion, and sexuality. What does it feel like to be a black man whose favorite video game can't take the time to make character creation tools that accurately depict your hairstyle, or feature protagonists that aren't either thugs or goofballs? How is the mindset of a large shooter-loving Arab game-playing population affected when their favori [...]

    22. All of these essays are nice, though this book is best for someone who is not a huge member of the game development community. I'm a game developer for a lot of my time at the moment, so a slight majority of the essays concerned topics I hear about a lot or am familiar with, from feminism in games, to the GamerGate issue, race issues for blacks and Muslims in games, and more. There were a few essays concerning things that don't come up as often in the social media sphere of games.Ola Wikander (t [...]

    23. A uneven collection with some gems and some underwhelming pieces. The Sarkeesian/Cross piece was an interesting mixture of Sarkeesian's knack for pointing out kinda obvious problems in games and Cross's overly ostentatious prose, which give it this weird sense of being quite academic but not actually saying anything particularly new or nuanced. Bogost continues to write academic fluff.And while a good article on its own, I would have liked to see more from Zoe Quinn's writing beyond Depression Q [...]

    24. This is a collection of personal and research essays about how video games can and have influenced society. There's a woman who grew up playing the classic text adventure game Colossal Cave Adventure with a friend. There's an Arab gamer who explains how Arab gamers don't care about stereotypes in Call of Duty. There's an analysis of the Cold War's influence on post-apocalyptic video games from Missile Command to The Last of Us. So much interesting stuff.But this book was pretty clearly put toget [...]

    25. For those passionate about video games or interested in the industry, this is a good read that won't take you more than a few hours. The State of Play is an anthology of essays from video game journalists, developers, and critics, who explore design, themes, history, and culture of the industry. For example: Zoe Quinn has a great chapter on her living on her last dime, finishing a Twine game exploring the feeling of depression, something she was going through herself. This game not only brought [...]

    26. Yeah, I had a Gameboy and have my fair share of memories of playing computer games and N64 with friends, but my gaming history is short and I'm just now learning some of the jargon of games and gaming genres as I realize that not everything is Halo. This book made me excited about games in a way I haven't been since elementary school, and the variety of voices made me feel like games could be for me, too. This book is Important, varied, scholarly, funny, and thought-provoking. The people writing [...]

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