In the Name of Jesus: Reflections on Christian Leadership

In the Name of Jesus Reflections on Christian Leadership Henri Nouwen was a spiritual thinker with an unusual capacity to write about the life of Jesus and the love of God in ways that have inspired countless people to trust life fully Most widely read amon

  • Title: In the Name of Jesus: Reflections on Christian Leadership
  • Author: Henri J.M. Nouwen
  • ISBN: 9780824512590
  • Page: 234
  • Format: Paperback
  • Henri Nouwen was a spiritual thinker with an unusual capacity to write about the life of Jesus and the love of God in ways that have inspired countless people to trust life fully.Most widely read among the over 40 books Father Nouwen wrote is In the Name of Jesus For a society that measures successful leadership in terms of the effectiveness of the individual, FatherHenri Nouwen was a spiritual thinker with an unusual capacity to write about the life of Jesus and the love of God in ways that have inspired countless people to trust life fully.Most widely read among the over 40 books Father Nouwen wrote is In the Name of Jesus For a society that measures successful leadership in terms of the effectiveness of the individual, Father Nouwen offers a counter definition that is witnessed by a communal and mutual experience For Nouwen, leadership cannot function apart from the community His wisdom is grounded in the foundation that we are a people called This beautiful guide to Christian Leadership is the rich fruit of Henri Nouwen s own journey as one of the most influential spiritual leaders of the 20th century.

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      Published :2019-02-10T19:31:07+00:00

    1 thought on “In the Name of Jesus: Reflections on Christian Leadership”

    1. Glad to return to this foundational book on Christian leadership. It's so simple, but so full of truth bombs.

    2. Nouwen's writing is so powerful! Humility just drips from every word. He desires, more than anything, that Jesus would be more so he could become less. I was so impressed with this little book on leadership.He challenges the reader: 1. Do you want to be relevant? Pray more.The Christian leader of the future is called to be completely irrelevant and to stand in this world with nothing to offer but his or her own vulnerable self. That is the way Jesus came to reveal God's love. (30)2. Do you want [...]

    3. Through the lens of Jesus' temptation in the wilderness, and his commissioning of Peter at the end of John's gospel, Nouwen sets a trajectory for Christian leadership. He wrote this book after leaving academia for L'Arche and one of the best parts of the book is his description of how Bill, a developmentally disabled man, shared in Nouwen's ministry in presenting this material in Washington, D.C. Nouwen questions contemporary leadership culture and the chasing of relevance, popularity and power. [...]

    4. One of the most powerful books I have read! As a period of consistency, and even a little bit of comfort comes to an end, I am realizing more of who I am and who I was created to be. This book helped me connect the dots, and somewhat make sense of how to navigate transitional moments and times. I often forget my call to be vulnerable and to continue to go into spaces that force me to be uncomfortable. As organized ministry may die down, having a heart for knowing Jesus more will not. Jesus is af [...]

    5. Fr. Nouwen is masterful. He presents a version of Christian faith that is very different than the evangelical American brand I learned. It is rich and true to Jesus. His advice for leaders in this century is profound. The only slight thing that bothered me was the notion that Nouwen was sacrificing much by living among the profoundly disabled. The rewards of such a leading always outweighs the cost.

    6. I had to read this for a group in my church, There are some biblical truths in this book, however nothing new or unordinary. In this book he makes some cringy/questionable statements like "we have to be mystics" "we have to be the incarnation" and abandons some definitions of words similar to Rob Bell. Like bad definition of what a mystic actually is or what theology is. He also claims theologians find it hard to pray. If you want an excellent book on Christian leadership I would not recommend t [...]

    7. Ante las tres tentaciones de sentirse importante, ser espectacular y tener poder, Jesús pregunta "¿me amas?", entrega la tarea de "apacentar las ovejas", y el desafío de que "otro te conducirá. Sólo la práctica de la oración contemplativa, la confesión y el perdón, y la reflexión teológica hacen creíble al lider cristiano del siglo XXI.Me llamó la atención sobretodo el entender el liderazgo no como el pastor que guía las ovejas, sino como el que sirve al rebaño haciéndose parte [...]

    8. Loved it as a succinct and true treatise on Christian Leadership. A whole bunch of books have been written about "servant leadership," and many of them have been given to me over the years. Now I know where the other books were drawing inspiration. This one doesn't say too much or too little, and the incorporation of Nouwen's personal stories make it authentic and memorable.

    9. I read this for a course and admittedly against my will. It starts off a little slow, but there were multiple points throughout the book where I had to stop and admire his ability to articulate things I've always thought, point out things I'd never see, and challenge me in ways I hadn't expected.

    10. After reading Henri Nouwen's The Way of the Heart recently during some times of fasting, I decided to move on to another book by Nouwen, In the Name of Jesus. I liked it perhaps even more than The Way of the Heart. The book is a version of an address Nouwen gave to an event in Washington, D.C sometime in the 1980s. It's written specifically to Christian leaders, but the content is relevant to any Christian.Nouwen gazes into the future and imagines what will be most significant for Christian lead [...]

    11. This is just a brief (one hour) reflection written because Nouwen was asked to speak about Christian leadership "in the Twenty-First Century."It's a puzzling assignment given to a priest who lived in a community of people with disabilities for the last decade of his life (he got the assignment about year 3 of that decade).I related to the author because the book is about caring for people over other agendas, and it is focused on Jesus, using the two stories of the temptation of Christ and Jesus [...]

    12. I really did enjoy this book, and I believe some of the insights were real jewels. However, I had little to no background on Nouwen before reading this book. For that reason, I was a little fuzzy on what he meant in some of his terminology. I was also left a little unsure why the exhortations were directed specifically at Christian leaders, unless by "leadership" he means something much more broad than I do. Most of his (generally very biblical) insights could be applied to any disciple of Chris [...]

    13. A short but incisive read, Henri Nouwen calls to account those currently in or striving towards Christian leadership today. Using the Gospel stories of the temptations of Jesus and Peter's call to be a shepherd as his reference points, Nouwen points out that Christian leaders are constantly tempted to be relevant, popular and powerful. To act alone, and be seen as "the hero." However, Nouwen emphasizes that to truly act in the name of Jesus requires almost the opposite: being ready to stand amid [...]

    14. As usual, Nouwen is concise and brief yet ever-profound, filling his deceptively short chapters with insight that are worth continual thought and reflection long after the book is closed. In this book, Nouwen's wisdom helps us to evaluate the way in which we engage our leadership responsibilities and perceive subtle temptations and obstacles that prevent us from growing. He then offers Biblical insight into ways that we can find spiritual life in our ministry, allowing us (and those we serve) to [...]

    15. "My movement from Harvard to L'Arche made me aware in a new way how much my thinking about Christian leadership had been affected by the desire to be relevant, the desire for popularity, and the desire for power." Nouwen reflects on the three desert temptations of Jesus as he considers his own temptations. In this short book he explores what it means to be in community, confessing our sins, sharing our brokenness, invested in contemplative prayer that we might proclaim and share in the love of J [...]

    16. usually when authors say things like, "there's two kinds of people in this world," or "this is a battle of two opposites," they're saying everything and nothing at the same time. not so with this book: nouwen has some sincere struggles that he's identified and lights the path towards christ-likeness. a quick but profound read with lessons that will stay with you.

    17. A wonderful short book that is so inspiring, as Nouwen always is. The essence of the book is summed up in one sentence, “I am deeply convinced that the Christian leader of the future is called to completely irrelevant and to stand in this world with nothing to offer but his or her own vulnerable self.” (p. 17)

    18. This was actually not so bad to read-even for a non-Christian. I gave this only two stars, however, because I didn't think that any of the ideas were original. It just sounded like Nouwen took things that I've heard preached at my school and put them into prettier words.

    19. This was a good reflection on the counter-intuitive, counter-cultural nature of Christian leadership. While our culture prizes competence, relevance, prestige and power, the Christian priorities should be love and prayer with humility.Not a terribly profound message, but very important one.

    20. 5 stars = Yearly re-read4 stars = Re-read eventually3 stars = Very Good2 stars = OK1 stars = Pass on this one.0 stars = Couldn't finish it.

    21. Henri Nouwen’s, In the Name of Jesus, explores Christian Leadership as he tells of his personal growth during his move from Harvard to L’Arche. The author transparently tells of preconceived ideas of ministerial leadership and how this was changed during his time spent living among the mentally handicapped. Nouwen discussed these lessons as he breaks down each preconceived idea that not only plagued him but many other leaders. These areas are divided into discussions of the problematic areas [...]

    22. I underlined so much in this book. It's short but full of SO much to ponder. Nowen intertwines his pondering with biographical details of his own journey from respected academic to ministry in a home for the mentally handicapped. Here he found people who could not be controlled or manipulated into ways of thinking that Nouwen thought were right or important. He found people who lived simply and with their heart; and VERY honestly. It seems that this ministry revealed more the truth of where Nouw [...]

    23. Highly recommended by the president of Regent college, this book was not a disappointment. A short, simple manuscript of an address by Henri Nouwen at the Center for Human Development in Washington D.C.He offers three points - which amount to three corrections of our perception of Christian leadership. Like Jesus in Matthew 4, leaders of today face three temptations. They must resist them and respond to Jesus's words to Peter in John 21. These involve three disciplines.1.) Resist relevance, love [...]

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