The Wooden Walls of Thermopylae

The Wooden Walls of Thermopylae The Athenians have won their battle at Marathon Now they await the Great King s revenge as he works to assemble a massive army unlike any the world has ever seen In Athens a city seething with treach

  • Title: The Wooden Walls of Thermopylae
  • Author: Nick Brown
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 161
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Athenians have won their battle at Marathon Now they await the Great King s revenge as he works to assemble a massive army unlike any the world has ever seen In Athens, a city seething with treachery and intrigue, Mandrocles and his friends live, love and observe bystanders among politicians and factions fighting for power as the ultimate conflict draws near The WooThe Athenians have won their battle at Marathon Now they await the Great King s revenge as he works to assemble a massive army unlike any the world has ever seen In Athens, a city seething with treachery and intrigue, Mandrocles and his friends live, love and observe bystanders among politicians and factions fighting for power as the ultimate conflict draws near The Wooden Walls follows Mandrocles and the greatest figures of ancient Greece as they come to terms with their threatened civilization and the date with destiny at Thermopylae The fast paced and meticulously researched sequel to Luck Bringer Fascinating and entertaining, makes the reader feel present at the events together with Mandrocles the Luck Bringer Antonis Mistriotis, author of 507 450 B.C The Years that Gave Birth to Democracy

    • Free Read [Science Book] ↠ The Wooden Walls of Thermopylae - by Nick Brown ✓
      161 Nick Brown
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Science Book] ↠ The Wooden Walls of Thermopylae - by Nick Brown ✓
      Posted by:Nick Brown
      Published :2018-09-15T08:17:33+00:00

    1 thought on “The Wooden Walls of Thermopylae”

    1. Further adventures of Mandrocles: Continuation of his memoirs. His mentor, Miltiades, is no longer in the picture, so Mandrocles is taken under the wing of Themistocles, who wants to defeat the Persians through a massive fleet of ships--the "wooden walls." The whole novel tells of Themistocles's struggle to convince the other allies and Athenians that that is what the oracle had meant when she had said wooden walls would save Athens. We follow Mandrocles as our eyes in stages of the Greco-Persia [...]

    2. Marathon wasn't the end of it. In the end it merely provided a pause. We do tend to put things into convenient drawers, wrap them up into convenient parcels, but reality knows no such conveniences. All that the Fates see is the warp and the weft so it would be for Athens. Almost immediately we see the end of Miltiades, great hero of Marathon, as if destroyed by hubris, and a new player steps onto the stage."The Wooden Walls of Thermopylae" is the great tale of the struggle of Themistocles in his [...]

    3. Mandrocles, nicknamed 'Luckbringer' is the narrator of this tale of Greece at the time of the Persian invasions. A survivor and hero of Marathon, he serves Themistocles, also a veteran of Marathon and now an eminent and cunning politician. Themistocles plans to build a huge fleet to counter the inevitable renewal of hostilities with Persia, who have a new king, Xerxes. In doing so, he has to manipulate his enemies – former colleagues and friends – into exile and negotiate with the Spartan ki [...]

    4. Nick Brown is the Hemingway of the ancient world. His style of narrative ebbs with description while the plot maintains its momentum which is exactly what you need when reading about a period in history which is so far from our own. I loved how Brown brings the streets to life by not forgetting to tell us how the statues would have looked, how the honey-cakes would have tasted and how the bitter-herbs would have smelt. This sequel to Luck Bringer continues with the story of a boy, now a man, who [...]

    5. 3 1/2 stars, continues from the Luck Bringer. It seems like it is the middle book in a trilogy and gives more info than action. It develops the Mandrocles character more. Still good even if you are familiar with the actual history. His portrayal of Leonidas is different than the movie "300" but I just couldn't help picturing him like Gerard Butler. a good read

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