Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839

Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in Originally published in out of print and unavailable for almost a century Frances Anne Kemble s Journal has long been recognized by historians as unique in the literature of American slavery an

  • Title: Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839
  • Author: Fanny Kemble John A. Scott
  • ISBN: 9780820307077
  • Page: 458
  • Format: Paperback
  • Originally published in 1863, out of print and unavailable for almost a century, Frances Anne Kemble s Journal has long been recognized by historians as unique in the literature of American slavery and invaluable for obtaining a clear view of the peculiar institution and of life in the antebellum South.Fanny Kemble was one of the leading lights of the English stage in thOriginally published in 1863, out of print and unavailable for almost a century, Frances Anne Kemble s Journal has long been recognized by historians as unique in the literature of American slavery and invaluable for obtaining a clear view of the peculiar institution and of life in the antebellum South.Fanny Kemble was one of the leading lights of the English stage in the nineteenth century During a tour of America in the 1830s she met and married a wealthy Philadelphian, Pierce Butler, part of whose fortune derived from his family s vast cotton and rice plantation on the Sea Islands of Georgia After their marriage she spent several months living on the plantation Profoundly shocked by what she saw, she recorded her observations of plantation life in a series of journal entries written as letters to a friend But she never sent the letters, and not until the Civil War was on and Fanny was divorced from Pierce Butler and living in England were they published.This Brown Thrasher edition incorporates the valuable introduction written by John A Scott for the 1961 edition published by Alfred A Knopf, together with the editor s appendices to that edition It provides the modern reader with the historical and biographical background to move freely and with ease in Mrs Kemble s world.

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      Published :2019-02-10T01:46:00+00:00

    1 thought on “Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839”

    1. This is one of those books that I'm glad I read, but was glad to be finished with. Before I read it, I knew that Kemble was a British actress who spent a winter on a Georgia plantation before the Civil War, but I didn't know the whole story, which was only slowly revealed in the text. (A little web research clarified a lot of points for me.) Kemble married an American man who subsequently inherited two plantations, on Butler Island and St. Simons Island. Kemble suddenly found, to her horror, tha [...]

    2. English actress Fanny Kemble, who married Philadelphian Pierce Butler in 1834, spent the winter and spring of 1838-39 with her husband and their two young daughters on plantations her husband inherited in Georgia. Already philosophically opposed to slavery, Fanny wrote a journal about her observations and experiences in the form of letters to a friend, which were never sent. This was published during the Civil War, more than 10 years after she and Pierce divorced and she returned to England.Fann [...]

    3. After having read this, my father-in-law took it up on a visit. He wasn't finished when it was his time to leave so I gave it to him. When I started rebuilding my library I decided I had to purchase it again. I never really fully understood the horrors of slavery until I read this book. Frances Anne Kemble was an amazing and brave woman.

    4. This is a collection of letters written by Frances Kemble-Butler to her friend Elizabeth Sedgwick, a notable American novelist. Fanny is a British actress who married an American man, not knowing when she married him that he would someday inherit a large plantation with hundreds of slaves. Fanny is an abolitionist. In these letters she recounts the day to life she is experiencing in Georgia. Her observations are fascinating as she recounts first hand the conditions endured by the slaves. She at [...]

    5. A book everyone in America should read, not for style but for content. It gives priceless insight into the life of both slave and slave holder from the eyes of an English woman who married into a slaveholding family. Difficult to read at times due to subject matter but essential nonetheless.

    6. good view of the life of a slaveholder from journal written by English wife who had abolitionist leanings. So grateful we don't have to stay married to morally abhorrent people anymore to get by. I am losing my ability to focus on historical texts like this and didn't finish.

    7. I wish this book had been required reading for me ages ago, in high school, and believe that it ought to be required reading now. Fanny Kemble was a brilliant writer and humanist. She did not flinch from engaging with and ameliorating (as much as any woman would have been allowed) the suffering of slaves. Her descriptions of the dehumanizing conditions in which they lived totally discredit any apologies for slavery such as "Well, they are cared for and don't have to fend for themselves," since t [...]

    8. nhwvejournal/588685ml[return][return]Published in 1863, this is a series of letters from Kemble to her friend E[lizabeth Sedgwick] describing her four months as the wife of a Georgian plantation owner, and going into considerable detail about the living conditions of the slaves. It is horrific stuff, an eloquent argument against slavery, published twenty-five years after the event in a deliberate attempt to undermine British sympathy for the Confederacy in the middle of the Civil War. I haven't [...]

    9. A unique and meticulous account of life on a Southern plantation during the Antebellum period, Journal of a Residence on A Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839 is a must read for anyone wishing to gain a broader understanding of life in the American slave system. Having acquired great renown as an accomplished English actress, Fanny Kemble married a rich plantation-owning Philadelphian named Pierce Butler, and accompanied him along with her two children and nurse to his plantation in Georgia for the [...]

    10. This is NOT the edition I have, but it has the same ISBN number, so what can you do? My copy has a brown cover with a different picture.Early in this book, the author dismisses Harriet Martineau's argument that the growing mechanization of agriculture would eventually result in the end of plantation slavery. But Martineau was wrong in timing, not in means. Realistically, once the slaves were formally freed, their life conditions didn't change much in most cases--sharecropping is nominally freer [...]

    11. Important reading.How on earth could the slave owners and overseers not realize that in listening to the complaints of the slaves, this woman was actually doing the owners themselves a favor -rather than increasing discontent, listening gave an outlet to those slaves who confided in her, thus actually decreasing their discontent by making them feel heard, and actually adding years to the lives of the masters and overseers. Had the slaves not felt listened to, they might have slit the throats of [...]

    12. I appreciated my edition's introduction giving background information about Fanny Kemble, as well as addressing some of the journal's criticisms over the years.An interesting perspective on coastal plantation life in the 1830s. At times harsh and emotion-provoking, there are other passages that are positively lyrical.

    13. * Understanding Oppression: African American Rights (Then and Now)Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839 (Brown Thrasher Books Ser.) by Frances Kemble | Amazing women, actress, and #abolitionist.Free Audio - youtube/watch?v=2lLyH

    14. Eye-opening account of life on a plantation in Southern Georgia. The author is a plantation-owners wife who sympathizes with the slaves working on her husband's plantation and actually later in life fights for abolition. Not a fun or easy read, but the best representation of real life in the South I've ever experienced. Once required reading by schools - it should be still!

    15. SlaverySlaveryA good book but a slow read because of the difference in language and spelling between then and now. Slaves were treated horribly on the best of plantations.

    16. I didn't finish the book. The intro was medium interesting telling about the times and her reasons for writing, but once I actually started her letters, I felt like I already had read what I needed to know.

    17. Readable, particularly since the diary entries were written before the civil war. It gives new meaning to what slavery did to the South as well as the those under the lash. I read it for information on plantations, excluding the use of slaves.

    18. This book is a wonderful study of how a British woman dealt with slavery while living in America during the 19th century. It shows how she was able to hold on to her anti-slavery views and yet how even these ideas were not completely untouched by racism. It's a very good read.

    19. perspicacious, pointed, prescient, and altogether pluperfect, as my late southern mother might have said had she had the opportunity to read and respond to this shimmering memoir.

    20. I thought this an interesting read- a bit slow in some parts. Gina and michelle should really enjoy this listing. Remember our road trip? :)

    21. Loved the way she wrote, made it seem like I was right there on the plantation. Absolutely appalled how the slaves were treated.

    22. It was a privilege to read this journal. Kemble was a compassionate and prophetic woman. It took me many months to slog through this book, mainly because it was so depressing, but I am glad I did.

    23. Brilliant first-hand writing of the evils of slavery by an English woman who married a southern plantation owner.

    24. Well done but tedious reading. I came away w/a more hardened look towards how the southern slave owners treated their slaves.

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