Veiled Warriors: Allied Nurses of the First World War

Veiled Warriors Allied Nurses of the First World War Caring for the wounded of the First World War was tough and challenging work demanding extensive knowledge technical skill and high levels of commitment Although allied nurses were admired in their

  • Title: Veiled Warriors: Allied Nurses of the First World War
  • Author: Christine E. Hallett
  • ISBN: 9780198703693
  • Page: 214
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Caring for the wounded of the First World War was tough and challenging work, demanding extensive knowledge, technical skill, and high levels of commitment Although allied nurses were admired in their own time for their altruism and courage, their image was distorted by the lens of popular mythology They came to be seen as self sacrificing heroines, romantic foils to theCaring for the wounded of the First World War was tough and challenging work, demanding extensive knowledge, technical skill, and high levels of commitment Although allied nurses were admired in their own time for their altruism and courage, their image was distorted by the lens of popular mythology They came to be seen as self sacrificing heroines, romantic foils to the male combatant and doctors handmaidens, rather than being appreciated as trained professionals performing significant work in their own right Christine Hallett challenges these myths to reveal the true story of allied nursing in the First World War one which is both complex and absorbing Drawing upon evidence from archives across the world, Veiled Warriors offers a compelling account of nurses wartime experiences and a clear appraisal of their work and its contribution to the allied cause between 1914 and 1918, on both the Western and the Eastern Fronts Nurses believed they were involved in a multi layered battle Primarily, they were fighting for the lives of their patients on the second battlefield of casualty clearing stations, transports, and military hospitals Beyond this, they were an integral component of the allied military machine, putting their own lives at risk in field hospitals close to the front lines, on board hospital ships vulnerable to enemy submarine attack, and in base hospitals subject to heavy bombardment As working women in a sometimes hostile, chauvinistic world, allied nurses were also fighting to gain recognition for their profession and political rights for their sex For them, military nursing might help to win not only the war itself, but also a powerful voice for women in the post war world.

    • Best Download [Christine E. Hallett] ✓ Veiled Warriors: Allied Nurses of the First World War || [Spirituality Book] PDF ☆
      214 Christine E. Hallett
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Christine E. Hallett] ✓ Veiled Warriors: Allied Nurses of the First World War || [Spirituality Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Christine E. Hallett
      Published :2018-09-10T22:47:07+00:00

    1 thought on “Veiled Warriors: Allied Nurses of the First World War”

    1. Prior to World War I, a nurse’s status was in a state of professional flux during wartime. Nurses were viewed as romantic foils to brave doctors or self-sacrificing heroines. Other times they were seen as doctors’ handmaidens. As a result, this mythology crippled a nurses’ ability to become full partners in the care of battlefield wounded. Christine E. Hallett’s book, Veiled Warriors: Allied Nurses of the First World War challenges these biases and traces their role through World War I a [...]

    2. One can only assume Christine Hallett has some kind of grudge against Vera Brittain. The purpose of this book, as she states in her introduction, is to defuse some of the myths that have grown up around the iconic figure of the First World War nurse - the romantic 'angel of mercy' all in white with the Red Cross on her breast, the heroic volunteer, the plucky VAD bullied by her more qualified peers, the brave nurse risking all to save her patients. Throughout this book she does her best to punct [...]

    3. This is a very readable and fascinating book on the experience of nurses (both professionals and volunteers) during the first world war. It discusses the problems of social and professional recognition which nurses strove with, when many countries did not yet have any system for certifying nurses as having been trained and standards varied widely. It also gives a window on the personal experiences of women in what was otherwise a very male dominated world of the WW1 military.The author does seem [...]

    4. I was fascinated by this book and thoroughly enjoyed it. I had been wanting to deepen my knowledge of nursing during WWI for some time and this book certainly filled that desire whilst at the same time, ensuring that I want to read more by Prof. Hallett! It is written extremely well - Prof. Hallett is a logical and meticulous writer without being dry and boring. I had a sense of perhaps being in one of her classes and wished that I had been able to discuss with her some of the points she raises [...]

    5. Kudos to Hallett for a comprehensive yet concise history of the heroes who remain misty and unseen at the edges of the battlefields, military nurses of the first world war. She has tried to interview or access material about nurses from every single nation that participated on the Allied side, and it turns out that is a lot more countries than I had realized. Though she was limited by the fact that she does not speak many different languages and could not always get interpreters, she has done a [...]

    6. While presented as a single volume, this book is actually a series of shorter historical narratives focusing on the roles and experiences of nurses during WW1. This book deconstructs many of the myths propagated about WW1 nursing (the romantic nurse, the plucky VAD, and the stern, unfeeling matron, to name a few) and examines the lives of these women whose technical expertise is often overlooked in modern storytelling. A bit dry, but a great read for those interested in WW1 and the history of mi [...]

    7. Complex account of a completely neglected aspect of the First World War -- that of the nursing profession dealing with the gravely wounded and ill soldiery restricted to the nurses for the Allies by the lack of materials for those of the Central Powers, the book brings the challenges alive by quoting contemporary diaries, letters, and articles detailing the immense pressures and privations faced by the nursing staff during the War attempts to cover all the theaters of the War and all the natio [...]

    8. Almost exclusively focused on Anglophone nurses, though many of these worked with French, Belgian, Russian, Serbian, Italian, and other services, so there's at least some representation of most of the Allied Powers. Lots of great material from letters, diaries, memoirs, etc.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *