White Pine: Poems and Prose Poems

White Pine Poems and Prose Poems Mary Oliver is one of the most popular and widely honored poets in the United States In this much awaited collection of forty poems eighteen previously unpublished she writes of the silky bonds betwee

  • Title: White Pine: Poems and Prose Poems
  • Author: Mary Oliver
  • ISBN: 9780151001316
  • Page: 163
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Mary Oliver is one of the most popular and widely honored poets in the United States In this much awaited collection of forty poems eighteen previously unpublished she writes of the silky bonds between every person and the natural world, of the delight of writing, of the value of silence Says James Dickey, Mary Oliver works a true spell, unlike any other poet Mary Oliver is one of the most popular and widely honored poets in the United States In this much awaited collection of forty poems eighteen previously unpublished she writes of the silky bonds between every person and the natural world, of the delight of writing, of the value of silence Says James Dickey, Mary Oliver works a true spell, unlike any other poet s, the enchantment of the true maker.

    White Pine Press F rom the classic writers of Asia to contemporary voices from around the world, White Pine Press is your passport to a World of Voices We publish literature which explores the world of ideas and cultures The cultures that make up the Amercan mosaic and celebrate the diversity of the world. White Pine Press Poetry Prize White Pine Press Poetry Prize The Annual White Pine Press Poetry Prize Competition The Annual White Pine Press Poetry Prize competition will open for submissions on July . Pine A pine is any conifer in the genus Pinus, p i n u s , of the family Pinaceae Pinus is the sole genus in the subfamily Pinoideae.The Plant List compiled by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Missouri Botanical Garden accepts species names of pines as current, together with unresolved species and many synonyms. Christmas Poems Primary Success Publications Guess Who London Bridge is Falling Down Guess whose beard is long and white Long and white, long and white Guess whose beard is long and white The Poem Farm Poems with Comparisons Hi Amy, So many poetry gifts you have given to us I am catching up on some blog reading and hoping to get back in the writing groove Your comparison poems and the blue sky day we enjoyed have my wheels turning I am especially fond of The Locket and the Pine Bride. Poets Corner James Joyce Chamber Music Chamber Music I Strings in the earth and air Make music sweet Strings by the river where The willows meet There s music along the river For Love wanders there, November, Autumn, Fall Poems, Quotes, Folklore, Sayings November Quotations for Gardeners, Walkers, and Lovers of the Green Way Poems, Quotes, Folklore, Myths, Customs, Holidays, Traditions Celebrations, Sayings, Poetry Longfellow The Poet s Calendar, In the Harbor Search Enter Search Term Submit Search List All Poems You may search for phrases by quoting your search eg Sweet the memory The Poems gottfriedbennpoems Added April Comparing Translations X Kann keine Trauer sein No need for sorrow I have organised my translations of Benn s poems according to the following categories I Juvenilia Rauhreif Hoarfrost Gefilde der Unseligen Fields of the unblessed II Morgue Kleine Aster Little Aster Schne Jugend Lovely Wedding Poems The Spruce The best wedding readings are romantic writings that express what you believe about love and marriage Naturally, love poems are a popular choice to use for wedding readings.Here are some of the most romantic love poems that were practically written to be used in a wedding ceremony.Review these poems with your spouse to be and decide which ones best reflect the two of you.

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    1 thought on “White Pine: Poems and Prose Poems”

    1. Plenty of interesting bits. But so muchmore that I just don't get that I feel frustrated. It's me; it's not Oliver, but I still can't rate it as highly as I'm sure it deserves.I recommend you check out *Beside the Waterfall* but bear in mind that the format/ shape doesn't reproduce well, so when you see it some blogs it's wrong. Nine verses, each line of each verse indented, so it's rhythmic pennants."In Pobiddy, Georgia" a very old woman at a cemetery needs help from her descendents when it's t [...]

    2. Mary Oliver has the ability to describe, in perhaps as little as one or two lines, some quality of the natural world that to me is only a fleeting feeling or mood when I am out in the countryside or in the forest. I am sometimes astonished at how she is able to put into words of either poetry or prose, what, to my mind, are ineffable qualities.In the poem, Hummingbirds, for example, she describes the act of climbing a tree and realizing she has disturbed a hummingbird nestThe female, and the two [...]

    3. Another of Mary Oliver's collections that soars. She has the ability to compress into so few words what she notices about both the created world around us and the world of the heart that obviously overlaps with it. And her poems are a constant reminder to pay attention to life and those we love. The swan, for all his pomp, his robes of glass and pteals, wants only to be allowed to live on the nameless pond. The catbrier is without fault. The water thrushes, down among the sloppy rocks, are going [...]

    4. The first time I read a Mary Olive poem, someone had included At Blackwater Pond inside a card they sent me. I opened the card, read the poem, and was struck with such a profound, deep ringing of beauty and truth I instantly wept. The husband does not get it. He's not much for being outside, either. I guess you either get it or you don't. To me, Oliver's work is almost like Haiku, incredible truths distilled down into a sharp edge that cuts deep into your psyche. She is a naturalist, and observe [...]

    5. The best poem is William. And there are some wonderful lines. "There isn't anything in this world but mad love. Not in this world. No tame love, calm love, mild love, no so-so love. And of course, no reasonable love. Also there are 100 paths to the world that are easier than loving. But, who wants easier?"And, "I am going to spend my wife wisely. I'm going to be happy, and frivolous, and useful."

    6. Mary Oliver sings to my soul. I love that her poetry is so simple, yet if I really sit with it, it brings on layers and layers of ideas.

    7. "There isn't anything in this world but mad love. Not in this world. No tame love, calm love, mild love, no so-so love. And, of course, no reasonable love. Also there are a hundred paths through the world that are easier than loving. But, who wants easier? We dream of love, we moon about, thinking of Romeo and Juliet, or Tristan, or the lost queen rushing away over the Irish sea, all doom and splendor. Today, on the beach, an old man was sitting in the sun. I called out to him, and he turned. Hi [...]

    8. "To pay attention, this is our endless and proper work."& "To rise like a slow and beautiful poem. To live a long time." & "Then it turned and vanished. In shyness, perhaps. Or simply / because we get no more than such dreamy chances to look / upon the real world. The great door opens a crack, a hint / of the truth is given—so bright it is almost a death, a joy we / can't bear—and then it is gone."

    9. The poetry of Mary Oliver is full of a deep appreciation for the natural world in which we live, but also full of appreciation of silence and of connection, connection of the natural world and our own place in it. This collection is no different and, like every single volume of Oliver's poetry, well worth the tiny bit of time it takes to escape to her world, the world we also inhabit though we are often unaware.

    10. Constantly in awe of this poetess. She asks all the meaningful questions, and ties us to the natural world like no one else can. This might be favorite of the books. Only The Sea Mouse really knows. Highly recommended for those seeking introspection and solace. Mary delivers, every time.

    11. Mary Oliver is almost inarguably our best living poet. She has a talent for restoring language to its natural kingdom, the wild environs of nature. She is at times one with nature and apart from it, cataloging the unclassifiable with language that is both revelatory and sublime. This collection is not to be missed.

    12. It is always amazing to me how long it can take me to read a 55 page book when it contains the works of Mary Oliver. I just have to take small bites and savor each one. Below are the requisite bits that I feel I must share""After excitement we are so restful. When the thumb of fear lifts, we are so alive." -From May-a prose offering."To pay attention, this is our endless
and proper work." -From the poem Yes! No!"What a misery to be afraid of death.What wretchedness, to believe only in what can [...]

    13. Another Mary Oliver book I couldn't be without. It’s not among her very best, but it’s strong and marvelous and filled with awe at moments in nature, even the dark ones. She’s like a Zen poet crossed with Thoreau. Here’s one poem, where I’ve removed the line breaks: “I found a dead fox beside the gravel road, curled inside the big iron wheel of an old tractor that has been standing, for years, in the vines at the edge of the road. I don’t know what happened to it — when it came t [...]

    14. Not Oliver's best. But, for me, Oliver is like Didion: I'll take "not-her-best" any day. And the book has moments, especially as it crescendoes (from pianissimo to piano) with its poignant, soft and somehow lovely imagery of bones and skulls and corpses. And the line "the refined anguish of language"? Chills. That and the image of a a deer with green leaves growing on its antlers. Haunting, haunting.

    15. White Pine is good, but I think it's one of her earlier collections; I don't think it's as good as Red Bird, and definitely not as good as A Thousand Mornings. This collection concentrates almost entirely on nature and the cycle of life and death, which are good subjects for poems, but not when it's every poem in the book. Still, there are some really beautiful poems in there, and it's worth a read.

    16. I don't read much poetry; I think I got burnt out on the angst, common in much poetry, and intimidated that poetry was somehow beyond me. I do have to work, in the best sense of the word, to understand Mary Oliver; reading her work aloud provides an entirely different dimension. The poems "Grass", "Porcupine", & "March" could be daily meditations for me.

    17. I so enjoyed this collection of poems focusing on creation, the natural world, and changing seasons. Oliver perfectly blends words into stories, descriptions, and deeper meanings. I particularly enjoyed "Snails" and "December."

    18. I am in love with poetry again, and with Mary Oliver's poetry in particular. This is stuff that hits me where I live, in all the ways and all the places. So so wonderful. Must read more more more Mary Oliver.

    19. Maybe there's something zen here I'm not getting. Also, I know I picked up this book five or so years ago and thought, "I love this."But a lot of these poems feel like filler to me.These days I am hard to please, and annoy myself.

    20. I haven't found a single poem by Mary Oliver that doesn't speak to me in some manner. As with most of my poetry books, I will probably never "finish" this one. I keep pulling it out to read a while before bed time.

    21. Not my favorite book of Oliver's poems though I do love the one called "March" which talks about "mad love". Selling this one back to the bookstore though. It seems to be filled with poems of anger and grief, though not directlytat is the vibe.

    22. I really don't read very much poetry, but I ran across this book while I was shelving at the library. I thought I'd give it a try because many of the poems had to do with nature. I enjoyed reading this book while sitting outside. Quick read. Some of the poems were a bit bizaar.

    23. Man, how I love Mary Oliver. Her poems about nature always ring true to my lived experience. I want to reach in and touch the words, like I touch flowers when I go for a walk. (Except for the one about her bringing the dead fox home and cleaning its skeleton - no thanks.)

    24. My english class has had me writing poetry more than I have in years. This book has lovely nature poems and make me miss the country terribly. Short and sweet read.

    25. I only read three or four before I put the book down. This is one of those authors that I will need my lifetime to digest. Lyrical right to the, and dipping a toe just past, the point of meta.

    26. Poetry is the mystic language of underlying truths. Stones speaking. Visitations of deer. Oracle pines. Mary blows upon the feather of my soul.

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