Планетата на Шекспир

  • Title: Планетата на Шекспир
  • Author: Clifford D. Simak Клифърд Саймък Емануел Икономов
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 111
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
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      Posted by:Clifford D. Simak Клифърд Саймък Емануел Икономов
      Published :2018-08-11T01:42:27+00:00

    1 thought on “Планетата на Шекспир”

    1. A lone man trapped on an alien planet2 May 2012 I have been reading over some of the old science-fiction short stories that I wrote probably about 10 to 15 years ago (and no, they are not published, thank God) and I must admit that these stories are far inferior to some of the science-fiction that I have read recently. In a way they were my attempt at imagining what would be a good science-fiction television series but because making a television series is quite expensive, I put them down in boo [...]

    2. I started out a bit prejudiced- this book looked so old and was tucked away in a corner of a dusty old bookstore, cloaked in a torn and cheesy sci-fi cover. But even if was a little bit dated it just kept getting better the more I read.It reminded me a bit of the show 'Lost', in that there were tons of intriguing little mysteries that you just knew would be explained if you kept at it. Alien biology, alien archeology, ancient philosophy and the ache of 'time' travel, mixed with just the right am [...]

    3. Carter Horton came to Shakespeare's Planet the hard way. He spent a thousand years in frozen sleep to arrive at the first planet away from Earth that can support life. Now he is stranded with Ship, his almost human transportation and Nicodemus, his android companion. Yet he was not the first human on the planet, William Shakespeare stumbled across it when he entered a strange tunnel. While long dead, Shakespeare is remembered by another stranded inhabitant called Carnivore, the creature that bef [...]

    4. 'A ship, one man, one flat-footed stupid robot - Christ, what an expedition! And, furthermore, a pointless one-way expedition.'An exploratory spaceship from Earth takes a thousand years to find a suitable planet for life. Only one of the human crew survives the journey in cold storage, Carter Horton, a geologist. He has a telepathic relationship with the Ship, which itself consists of three very different uploaded minds. The robot is called Nicodemus, an all-purpose droid.But they immediately fi [...]

    5. Not since Hyperion have I seen a menagerie of characterizations from The Pond water creature, intelligent albino slugs, Shakespeare's skull, Carnivore, Horton Hears a Who and his worm-hole galloping girlfriend. I liked it way better than Way Station!

    6. Shakespeare’s Planet is another in a long line of Simak novels that entertains the idea of life and things beyond our human ken. In nearly all of his novels, there are attempts to represent a merging of intelligences/minds/personalities—alien and human—to suggest greater, even spiritual, possibilities. The mind meld in Shakespeare’s Planet is the sometimes comic conflation of three human’s personalities that work together, disembodied, as a single entity, the guiding force of an explor [...]

    7. A ship that's made up of three separate people land on a planet after a very long time. They thaw the only surviving member of the human crew and give him a multi-talented robot for company. Surprisingly they meet a big feral alien that greets them and speaks english, leading them to the remains of the human who lived with him, Shakespeare. A lot of weird images and complications follow.The book is mostly people getting stuck on the planet (or only a few square miles of it, it seems,) finding we [...]

    8. Typical Simak. A human, a robot and an organically-intelligent ship land on a distant planet thousands of light years away from Earth and meet a primitive monstrosity who shows them the last friend he had: Shakespeare. Whose bones are mounted above his dwelling. Now everyone's stranded, including a later, bare-breasted woman, unless the teleportation gate can be fixed. Meanwhile, there's this mysterious cosmic force overpowering them every evening. Entertaining--more so than it sounds. For the r [...]

    9. Бях забравила какво удоволствие е да се потопиш в света на Клифърд Саймък

    10. Carter Horton lands on Shakespeare's Planet with ship and Nicodemus, a robot. They soon make acquaintances with Carnivore, a very strange but English speaking creature. (view spoiler)[Shakespeare was a human, and most likely crazy. He was stuck on the planet with Carnivore because the interstellar tube that brought them to this planet was a one-way tube. Shakespeare and Carnivore spent their days together trying to figure out how to leave the planet until Shakespeare finally dies. Carter and Nic [...]

    11. Strange and disjointed. Weird characters on an unintentionally sequestered planet make me really empathize with the narrator, who lands on "Shakespeare's Planet," and is now stuck here forever. I felt the loneliness, the alienation, and a desire to go home or move on. The book probably deserves more than two stars as a dystopian travel-adventure SF novel.

    12. Shakespeare's Planet by Clifford D. Simak is one very weird book. It opens with a very simple premiseCarter Horton and three other crew members were sent into space on a sleeper ship a thousand years or so ago. The ship is a human/machine hybrid (with three human brains as part of its operating system--this supposedly makes sense didn't to me) and the mission? To seek out a planet suitable for human life. The goal? Once a planet was found they were supposed to return to earth so colonization cou [...]

    13. Unfortunately, there are a lot of typos in the Kindle edition. Hopefully, the book version doesn't have the same problem.Other than the typos, the story is enjoyable. The last part is especially interesting in that it ties up the story nicely, and yet doesn't. I can't explain it better than that, so you will have to read it and experience it yourself.

    14. Great read! Interesting for a book that was written in 1976….39 years later we are still having the same thoughts and conversations about science and the universe. Not to mention some of the same concerns about traveling great distances, time, different races or species, and technology. Although short and fast paced there were a couple of parts that seemed to drag on and that were centralized around several of the characters ‘growing’ through self realization and examination. The ‘happen [...]

    15. A fairly quick, interesting science fiction story by Simak. I enjoyed it - the story of Carter Horton awakening on a strange planet after being asleep for over 1,000 years immediately drew me in. The backdrop is what does Earth look like now, if it even exists? That seems to be in the back of Horton's mind more or less throughout the book. That question is never answered; and really, the whole story is a series of unanswered questions: why did Ship choose this planet over so many others, why was [...]

    16. my first clifford d. simak read -- i got it and cemetery world at the same time, and since this one had "from the author of cemetery world" on the cover, i thought i'd save it for later, and start here. the book starts abruptly, and it takes a while before the sf world starts to gel however once i understood the milieu i'd been dropped into, the story fell into its natural rhythms and made sense to me in its fantastic way -- the opposite effect from jonathan lethem's gun, with occasional music, [...]

    17. nwhytevejournal/2156451ml[return][return]One of Simak's typically low-key stories, with lots of interesting ideas - the central character has been in cold-sleep for a thousand years, and is the only living human survivor on a ship whose central computer merges three people's personalities; Shakespeare's Planet itself is the end point for a network of poorly understood interstellar transport tunnels, where the only intelligent creature mildly regrets eating the human known as Shakespeare a while [...]

    18. Though not considered one of Simak’s better works, I still loved “Shakespeare’s Planet”. Another short novel, it represents to me how many of the authors of the golden age of SF were able to flesh out a story around a simple concept without bloating up into huge epic novels. In this story, Simak sticks with his common devices of helpful but slightly annoying robots and aliens that are not simply anthropomorphisms of common earth creatures, putting them into a story that I couldn’t help [...]

    19. Like many others, I picked it up used, in a sale some years ago. It has become one of my fetish books of all time. It has that Simak trademark pastorale feel to it. Be warned: it's not an action-packed read. It is very contemplative. You discover things at the same time as the characters and there's a lot that is left purposedly unexplained (not for sequel reasons, just because of the nature of the things) but that actually adds to the satisfaction the books brought me. It's the kind of books yo [...]

    20. Un'astronave in viaggio ormai da tempo verso mondi abitabili, guidata da un centro di comando che riunisce le menti di tre esseri umani del passato, corrispondenti all'equipaggio conservato in animazione sospesa per tutto il volo siderale. Purtroppo al termine del viaggio, cioè all'arrivo su un pianeta abitabile, l'unico superstite è Carter Horton. Per fortuna ha con sè il robot Nicodemus, che è in grado a seconda dei casi di attingere a numerosi cervelli positronici, riservando qualche sorp [...]

    21. This book kept alternating between an existential crisis and that kooky classic science fiction charm of mystery and madness. Unforuntately Simak didn't really explain much in the end, let alone using science. I the end once of the characters were left wondering, explaining things as just "feeling like evil" and "projecting peace". They were left hopedone day an archoelogist would stumble upon Shakespeare's planet and make sense of things, and so was I.

    22. Shakespeare’s Planet is about a geologist that just got thawed out from being frozen for one thousand years on a spaceship. The ship actually has a mind of its own. Literally, three! It is trying to find a planet that can hold human life. But of course, he is not alone, his trusty robot Nicodemus is there to help him when needed. This book, even though it is short, feels as if it’s like 400 pages. Not only is it slow, but also a very confusing read.

    23. Good read. Touch to much of the brain tripping style of story telling (easy to move a narrative if you just let go of reason). The concepts are interesting and the open ended nature of the book gives you the chance to make your own decisions on what has and is happening. Maybe not my first choice for anyone looking to get started reading SF, but great for anyone who is versed in the genre.

    24. The first half was really good and oddly reminiscent of the movie Interstellar. However, as the book continued (and towards the end) most of it went in a direction that I didn't particularly like. I would have given it a rating of 5 but the end made it more of a 4. Also I thought the character of Elayne was irrelevant.

    25. A very quick and enjoyable sci-fi read from the 70's that examines social, environmental, and philosophical issues that are still relevant today. Dialogue is entertaining though a bit slow at times. Characters are interesting yet simple. If you are looking for a thought-provoking science fiction novel that doesn't lead into a series, I highly recommend it.

    26. The kind of classic sci-fi I've been longing for. Strange technologies that are mysterious and that aren't explained so well as to become boring. Humans interacting with time, space and other species. Glorious reading.

    27. One of Simak's better novels this still doesn't top my favorite (_The Visitors_), but it is interesting and philosophically reflective while still being plausible and not excessively introspective.

    28. Доста мудна книга - в 80% от времето разглеждаме само и единствено мислите на героите, което нямаше да е толкова лошо, ако те не се въртяха постоянно само около едно и също. Спокойно можеше да е разказ от 20 страници вместо книга на 200.

    29. Very interesting. Kinda vague. Short and mysterious, like the definition of time that it's about. Read this for something unusual. It'll leave u thinking.

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