Troublemakers: Stories by Harlan Ellison

Troublemakers Stories by Harlan Ellison In a career spanning than years Harlan Ellison has written or edited books than stories essays articles and newspaper columns two dozen teleplays and a dozen movies Now for the first

  • Title: Troublemakers: Stories by Harlan Ellison
  • Author: Harlan Ellison
  • ISBN: 9780743423984
  • Page: 496
  • Format: Paperback
  • In a career spanning than 50 years, Harlan Ellison has written or edited 75 books, than 1700 stories, essays, articles and newspaper columns, two dozen teleplays, and a dozen movies Now, for the first time anywhere, Troublemakers presents a collection of Ellison s classic stories chosen by the author that will introduce new readers to a writer described byIn a career spanning than 50 years, Harlan Ellison has written or edited 75 books, than 1700 stories, essays, articles and newspaper columns, two dozen teleplays, and a dozen movies Now, for the first time anywhere, Troublemakers presents a collection of Ellison s classic stories chosen by the author that will introduce new readers to a writer described by the New York Times as having the spellbinding quality of a great nonstop talker, with a cultural warehouse for a mind.

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    1 thought on “Troublemakers: Stories by Harlan Ellison”

    1. I hadn’t read anything by Ellison before, although I was well aware of his reputation in the realms of sci-fi, fantasy, and horror. Troublemakers is a collection of his short stories that was put together for a high-school audience, but I think it works well as an introduction for a reader of any age. The stories inside are each some combination of sci-fi, horror, and fantasy, and they cover a very wide range of topics and lengths. There are a couple stories that didn’t do much for me, but m [...]

    2. Despite this article claiming that Troublemakers is a greatest hits collection of Harlan Ellison's short stories, I am strongly inclined to disagree. After being impressed by I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream I was eager to pick up another collection. Looks like I should have gone with Deathbird Stories instead. This collection has more of the infuriatingly bad commentary that Ellison is famous for. Before each story, we have entirely too much Creepy Old Uncle trying to rap with his Too Cool For [...]

    3. Much as I love the Crotchety Old Bastard, I've never been able to make it through this particular collection of his stories.

    4. Troublemakers is a 2001 retrospective targeted at the YA market. This is an odd concept that does not really work well. It’s not a Best-of-Ellison collection as much as What-Has-Ellison-Written-That-Teenagers-Might-Like? The result is a compendium with a few great stories and a bunch of moderately entertaining fluff pieces (full disclosure: I like Harlan’s serious dramatic stories but rarely take to his kitsch humor). While not a stellar cohesive volume of fiction, there are some interesting [...]

    5. I've loved Harlan Ellison for many years, but this particular anthology has too many mediocre stories and not enough really good ones. Any Ellison anthology is worth reading, but readers who want to try him should look instead for another collection, "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream."

    6. This is an interesting collection of stories that Ellison selected because he felt they would appeal to a younger audience than most of his current readers, and he hoped it would serve as an introduction of his work and perhaps have a special message for these young "troublemakers." It's a nice mix of familiar classics and lesser-known works, with selections from the mid-1950s through his most famous and productive years. Jeffty is Five, Soldier, and "Repent Harlequin!" said the Ticktockman are [...]

    7. I'm a huge fan of Harlan Ellison and have been for years. His ability to write dark and complex stories, short little absurdist ditties, and everything in between is one of the reasons that you can read story collection after story collection and never feel deja vu. Every story is a world of its own. This collection has a bit of everything and is a decent intro to his work. Only down side? The book was intended as a collection for high school students and if there's one person you REALLY don't w [...]

    8. I love Harlan Ellison. There were a couple of "misses" in this anthology -- stories that left me thinking, "what was the point?" The majority of them are wonderful. There are two big classics here: "Repent Harlequin! Said the Ticktock Man" and "Soldier." Since this anthology is themed (i.e. stories about troublemakers or trouble-making in general), Ellison has written a curmudgeonly invective to introduce each one; I enjoyed them thoroughly. He wrote a new story for the anthology, "Never Send to [...]

    9. I cannot believe it took me so long to discover Harlan Ellison. I enjoyed most of the short stories in this collection, reflecting Ellison's sharp mind and vivid imagination. He sure is a good story teller - and a master of creative, sophisticated insults!One of the characters (Ferreno in 'Night Vigil') somehow reminded me of Desmond in the TV series 'Lost'. Both are isolated men, burdened with a nonsense (but important) task to save the world. I wonder if Ellison's story influenced Lost's scrip [...]

    10. Intended for the YA market, Ellison attempted to pick stories with a life lesson of sorts. Whatever, it's an entertaining selection, with a couple of rarities, and "Never Send to Know for Whom the Lettuce Wilts," a long, uncollected story that's pretty funny, about an alien with a very long-term plan to demoralize us through broken buttons, bent nails and brown lettuce.

    11. Ellison is the master of speculative fiction. And he has masterfully put together a masterful collection of masterful stories. Did I mention he was the master?Kidding aside, every one of these stories is flawless. Ellison's commentary on each story is also a delight - mock-serious, mock-humourous, always insightful.Do not miss this book.

    12. This is a fine introduction to the work of Ellison. The collection is a trifle uneven but it contains many of Harlan's best known stories. If you know someone looking for an excellent writer to follow, give them this. You will fall in love with the way this man turns a phrase and this collection will open the door to Ellison's wonderland.

    13. Found this at a used book store in Montclair, NJ. Score! Many of the stories I read before in other Ellison collections, and they are always a pleasure to read again. But, there's still many that I visited for the first time. Enjoyed it all immensely!

    14. Meh. I love me some Ellison, but I wish I'd read this book when I was young enough to appreciate it more. "Man in his early 40s" is obviously not the target audience of this collection. Still, there are some hits here, such as "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman."

    15. Harlan never disappoints.Another great collection from the man who makes me think. Sometimes good things, sometimes bad, but always a riveting ride.

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