Slave Religion: The "Invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South

Slave Religion The Invisible Institution in the Antebellum South Twenty five years after its original publication Slave Religion remains a classic in the study of African American history and religion In a new chapter in this anniversary edition author Albert J R

  • Title: Slave Religion: The "Invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South
  • Author: Albert J. Raboteau
  • ISBN: 9780195174120
  • Page: 120
  • Format: Paperback
  • Twenty five years after its original publication, Slave Religion remains a classic in the study of African American history and religion In a new chapter in this anniversary edition, author Albert J Raboteau reflects upon the origins of the book, the reactions to it over the past twenty five years, and how he would write it differently today Using a variety of first andTwenty five years after its original publication, Slave Religion remains a classic in the study of African American history and religion In a new chapter in this anniversary edition, author Albert J Raboteau reflects upon the origins of the book, the reactions to it over the past twenty five years, and how he would write it differently today Using a variety of first and second hand sources some objective, some personal, all riveting Raboteau analyzes the transformation of the African religions into evangelical Christianity He presents the narratives of the slaves themselves, as well as missionary reports, travel accounts, folklore, black autobiographies, and the journals of white observers to describe the day to day religious life in the slave communities Slave Religion is a must read for anyone wanting a full picture of this invisible institution.

    • Best Read [Albert J. Raboteau] ↠ Slave Religion: The "Invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South || [Fantasy Book] PDF ↠
      120 Albert J. Raboteau
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Albert J. Raboteau] ↠ Slave Religion: The "Invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South || [Fantasy Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Albert J. Raboteau
      Published :2019-01-22T16:41:52+00:00

    1 thought on “Slave Religion: The "Invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South”

    1. This is something of a classic in the literature on the slave church. It started out as a doctoral thesis, but unlike some books that have that provenance, this one really engages. Sure, there is an incredible amount of detail - and a huge number of footnotes, reflecting Raboteau's careful research - but it still reads like a great piece of social history. He's clearly taken by the back-story of the black church, but certainly not in an overly romanticized way. Essential reading for me, as I con [...]

    2. While providing an excellent overview of the religious practices of American slaves, I thought the author repeated himself a lot. I would have liked more emphasis on the folk religion of Africa and more details on how those elements were adapted into slave religion. I did find the general description of Christian life intersting and disturbing--particularly the hypocrisy of plantation owners. There are many inspirational stories included in the book as well.

    3. Well researched (obviously) and important as part of the, at the time, burgeoning African studies movement. Perhaps ahead of its time in its treatment of the role of the oppressed in the history of the oppressors, and in its treatment of the encounter between groups as a place of innovation. Unfortunately, Raboteau's argument (and I think there is a good one: religious adaptation does not imply acquiescence or a "forgetting" of history) sometimes gets lost in the overwhelming detail provided (wh [...]

    4. History is mixed and uneven. Otto Scott's The Great Christian Revolution reminds us that the history of the world outside of Christ is a story of slavery and sacrifice.Christ having ascended to the right hand if the Father, the implications of His rule take time to work out in history and bear fruit, until every enemy is pit under His feet, and the last enemy is death. This book is a deep dive into the mixed and uneven progress of Christ's redemptive progress in one area of global transformation [...]

    5. The strength of Raboteau's book for my purposes is its discussion on how slaves became familiarized with Christianity. Unlike many narratives, Raboteau's claims most of the slaves learned of the tradition from other blacks rather than from slaveowners. The author shows how the slaves could draw upon African traditions to integrate Christianity. Furthermore, religion acted as a lens through which we can see their creativity as many of the slaves had to act out their religions and rituals in secre [...]

    6. A year ago when in NYC we walked by a bookstore and saw this book in the window. I wrote the title down and ordered it for my NOOK. I'm glad I did. It started as a doctoral thesis and morphed into this book. It is rich in detail, observations and brings to light another aspect of America's religious heritagea long neglected part. It has made me want to read further about the impact of all religious traditions brought to this country, either willingly or by force. I know a bit about how being a w [...]

    7. After reading excerpts of this book in a few anthologies and seeing it in the bibliographies of several books I liked, I decided to read the actual book. I understand the book's importance in it's field. It's a great read with a more expansive and nuanced discussion than just whether Christianity played a role in slaves docility or rebelliousness. A basic and interesting discussion on Africanisms in the Americas (Carribbean and South America vs. the US).

    8. This book is a classic in it's feed and the book to which all African American religious history must respond. Therefore, it is something of a must read.

    9. very academic, well researched, dense with history and implication. not everything can read like pop-psychology, and he prepares here a foundation for many.

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