Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home

Cronkite s War His World War II Letters Home A giant in American journalism in the vanguard of The Greatest Generation reveals his World War II

  • Title: Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home
  • Author: Walter Cronkite IV Maurice Isserman Tom Brokaw
  • ISBN: 9781426210198
  • Page: 470
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A giant in American journalism in the vanguard of The Greatest Generation reveals his World War II.

    • Free Read [Science Book] ☆ Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home - by Walter Cronkite IV Maurice Isserman Tom Brokaw ã
      470 Walter Cronkite IV Maurice Isserman Tom Brokaw
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Science Book] ☆ Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home - by Walter Cronkite IV Maurice Isserman Tom Brokaw ã
      Posted by:Walter Cronkite IV Maurice Isserman Tom Brokaw
      Published :2018-09-08T22:52:48+00:00

    1 thought on “Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home”

    1. Walter Cronkite must have been 45 years old when he was born. The letters are read by a family member and are interesting for the most part. He was a romantic kinda guy, who knew?

    2. Excellent view of WWII. Mentions others he knew: Clark Gable (decorated pilot & movie star), Ernest Hemingway, Andy Rooney, Noel Coward, Adele Astaire (Fred's sister), Edward R. Murrow, many with notoriety & without, those who came back & who didn't. If one does not study history, one is doomed to relive it I read this WWII account. God bless our uniformed defenders - living and passed.

    3. Wonderful set of letters telling of a man's love of wife and his experiences in the European theater of World War II. These love letters tell of life and loss in war.

    4. I started this book as a hardcover I happened to see in the library. So I read the first 100 pp in one format. Then I borrowed the audio copy and listened to it today on my phone (actually mostly in the car now that I have a car that will broadcast from my phone). Made the miles fly by today on my drive home from North Carolina. Actually some of it I re-read since I couldn't really remember where I left off. Basically this book is made up of letters written by Walter Cronkite, UP reporter in Eng [...]

    5. Cronkite’s War: His World War II Letters Home does not disappoint in its glimpses into the private life of the broadcasting icon as he shared his experiences with the love of his life in letters home. The book is written by Cronkite’s grandson in collaboration with Maurice Isserman and is a study in respect and admiration, tinged by just a touch of envy –that envy that every historian feels for those who lived in the world we can only experience vicariously.As you read the letters the youn [...]

    6. This was the story of a man who was born mature. It was pretty interesting although the letters were repetitive. Walter's grandson was the book's narrator. Walter had a strong romantic side.

    7. I'm a sucker for WWII and for Walter Cronkite. I'm that dork who would troll around YouTube for old broadcasts. Uncle Walter is one of my heroes, and is the gold standard for journalism and journalistic integrity. I've been eyeing this book on my parents' shelves and I *finally* got around to it after getting through the Halbertsam book that sucks up to Bill Belichick. Gag. This was a nice palate cleanser book, one you zip through after reading one that makes you want to gouge your eyes out. It [...]

    8. Cronkite's War is a collection of letters between Walter Cronkite and his wife during World War II. Sadly, it's a one side conversation as we have only the letter from Walter, and none of the letters written to him. It's a bit of an open diary as Cronkite moves from the U.S. to England and eventually into continental Europe as the war progresses toward V-E Day.To me, it paints a rather endearing portrait of the legendary newsman as his love and longing for his wife is evident throughout. However [...]

    9. This book shed light on what a war correspondent's life was like during WWII. It wasn't always very exciting (lots of drinks and dinners) and neither was this book. His grandson often introduced the letters Cronkite wrote home to his wife and this was often repetitive.

    10. During the height of his career, Walter Cronkite was, perhaps, the world’s most respected and trusted journalist. His career was launched during World War II, when he worked for United Press as a foreign correspondent, reporting on the progress of the Allied efforts to defeat Hitler’s Germany in Europe. This collection of letters he wrote home to his wife provide an intimate look into this important early period of his career.Of course, since these are the letters of a husband separated from [...]

    11. This was a somewhat interesting compilation of letters from Walter Cronkite to, mostly, his wife over the course of his service with UP during WWII. It is not quite a memoir, and probably qualifies as history to the extent of the author's commentary on the context in which Cronkite penned/typed his letters home. There are apparently a few instances where Cronkite's letters indicate that his later recollections, when he wrote of his experiences for his books, that he had suffered from the same ki [...]

    12. Once again I bemoan the fact that does not offer the option of half stars in the rating. This book definitely earned more than an average rating, however, a few things kept me from giving it a four star rating.As an amateur historian, I absolutely love getting to read and experience primary documents. One of the things I appreciated most from Cronkite IV's narration was his explanation of the discrepancies between his grandfather's memoirs and the letters. In his preview to one of the letters, [...]

    13. Loved the personal letters and insight into the life of the most respected newsman of the Century.Darlingest BetsyIt’s five minutes past one in the morning, I’m as limp as an old towel and I have no voiceI’m missing your letters. I worship you, darling.It’s 12 o’clock, honey, and I’m after my beauty sleep. Please know that I miss you every minute and am terribly lonely for you. Forever and ever, your adoring husband, WalterIt seems so long -- much longer than just a year -- since I r [...]

    14. Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home does not disappoint in its glimpses into the private life of the broadcasting icon as he shared his experiences with the love of his life in letters home. The book is written by Cronkite's grandson and namesake in collaboration with Maurice Isserman and is a study in respect and admiration, tinged by just a touch of envy -that envy that every historian feels for those who lived in the world we can only experience vicariously.As you read the letters t [...]

    15. I adore books written in letter form and was prepared to love this one, full of letters written from Walter Cronkite to his wife during WWII. I wound up skimming the letters as so many were mundane accounts of clothing problems, drinks after work, housing woesd such sadness and longing to have his wife join him on assignment in Europe. That said, intimate profiles of political and military leaders, battles planned and carried out, and personal opinions of same would probably have been censored o [...]

    16. Fascinating book. WWII as most have never seen it, full of tidbits on history and huge lessons as well. I've studied history but never seen WWII like this. Cronkite was a devoted correspondent to his wife during the years that he was stationed in London and later Belgium and Holland during the war. He rubbed elbows with Clark Gable as he was a fighter pilot, witnessed amazing things and learned everything he needed to become the Most Trusted Man in America.

    17. Growing up with Cronkite, I couldn't pass this up. What letters. His letters chronicled history. and so many years away with no visits home. Betsy sure had foresight to save them. I would like to know why his dog was named Judy. I do miss when news was NEWS and not entertainment. And I do miss his reassuring and confident voice.

    18. Wow. Love history and good handwritten letters but is it just me or does Cronkite come across bit a prick. Insufferably griping while others caught and died. Both soldier & civilian?He is a good reporter and did spend two years away from his family but it just came across as much as griping as it did a record of a major historical event. It could just be me.

    19. I wasn't sure how I would feel about this, listening to someone read Cronkite's letters. It was more than that. The author, his grandson, also put context behind the letters and noted when some appeared to be missing. It was a great glimpse into Cronkite's mind and his passion for his wife and for his job.

    20. Fascinating Insights into WW 2 from A War Correspondent's PerspectiveI listened to the unabridged audio book and found the entire book fascinating. It is over 11 hours but well worth the time and effort. Known later as "The Most Trusted Man in America" this book documents the letters that Walter Cronkite wrote home to his wife Betsy as a war correspondent for the United Press. I recommend it.

    21. This is a wonderful book containing the letters he wrote home to his beloved wife. The only thing that would have made this better was if Betsy's letters to him would have survived. They were an amazing couple and he, a national icon. I loved this book.

    22. interesting look at how he came of age in the 1940 - color blindness kept him out of the armed service, so yes the things he experience were not so good, but compared to the other men his age{20's] he had it really good in London.

    23. I listened to about a third of this. I think it would be a much better book to browse through. The entry paragraphs were usually interesting but sometimes the letters themselves were too much. I think someday I will pick it up again in a physical format.

    24. Great narrative about the war and mostly Walter Cronkite's beginning in journalism. I wish we still wrote letters to one another like they did back then. I know we have e-mail and it's not important, but there is something about holding a letter in your hand.

    25. It wasn't what I expected. Nice to see how he wrote to his wife, and to see he kept her informed. I was expecting a little more about what he was going through but understand why he didn't include it in letters home.

    26. Growing up listening to Walter Cronkite, I had my mental image of the trusted icon. But listening to these letters to his new bride (and the other redhead - their cocker spaniel) made me like him as a persone audio, BTW, was nicely narrated. I suspect that the narration enhances the book.

    27. I truly loved this book. Listening to his WWII letters to his wife transported me to a time I can only imagine.

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