The Hundred Years War: The English in France 1337-1453

The Hundred Years War The English in France DO YOU NOT KNOW THAT I LIVE BY WAR AND THAT PEACE WOULD BE MY UNDOING Sir John HawkwoodFrom to England repeatedly invaded France on the pretext that her kings had a right to the French thron

  • Title: The Hundred Years War: The English in France 1337-1453
  • Author: Desmond Seward
  • ISBN: 9780140283617
  • Page: 385
  • Format: Paperback
  • DO YOU NOT KNOW THAT I LIVE BY WAR AND THAT PEACE WOULD BE MY UNDOING Sir John HawkwoodFrom 1337 to 1453 England repeatedly invaded France on the pretext that her kings had a right to the French throne Though it was a small, poor country, England for most of those hundred years won the battles, sacked the towns and castles, and dominated the war The protagonists of DO YOU NOT KNOW THAT I LIVE BY WAR AND THAT PEACE WOULD BE MY UNDOING Sir John HawkwoodFrom 1337 to 1453 England repeatedly invaded France on the pretext that her kings had a right to the French throne Though it was a small, poor country, England for most of those hundred years won the battles, sacked the towns and castles, and dominated the war The protagonists of the Hundred Years War are among the most colorful in European history Edward III, the Black Prince Henry V, who was later immortalized by Shakespeare the splendid but inept John II, who died a prisoner in London Charles V, who very nearly overcame England and the enigmatic Charles VII, who at last drove the English out Desmond Seward s critically acclaimed account of the Hundred Years War brings to life all of the intrigue, beauty, and royal to the death fighting of that legendary century long conflict Desmond Seward is blessed with a talent for presenting historical facts in an accessible narrative An ideal author for recounting this complex period The Antioch Review

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    1 thought on “The Hundred Years War: The English in France 1337-1453”

    1. After reading this brisk and enlightening book, I kept asking myself "just how many people died in the Hundred Years War??" Overall, Seward provides a tour de force of this much forgotten and incredibly brutal period of warfare between England and France. Invasion after invasion, usually ending in a "chevauchee" -- essentially a rolling holocaust of men-at-arms and other troops that stole, burned, raped, and destroyed every town, every village, every farm, every church and monastary in their pat [...]

    2. I'm being a little mean to Desmond Seward with only three stars. I read 1066 by David Howarth around the same time and Howarth's writing makes Seward's serile and dry.That said, Seward gives a well sourced account of the wars that made up the Hundred Years War. He keeps accounts concise and includes enough personal information about the players to explain their behavior, but doesn't get too long-winded.A European Medieval History class would help in getting more out of this book and, unless you' [...]

    3. This was a great overview of one of the strangest wars in the Western world. It is a bit dry so most will be turned off by all the background on lineage and who is to inherit what. But for history buffs it is a good choice, covering all the major events.

    4. A very straightforward, linear account of the Hundred Years' War from a decidedly English-as-protagonists-leaning point of view. This isn't a recently written book; I believe the first publishing was 1978. As a result, some of the writing comes off as a little dated or discordant to today's reader - for example, the author describing Charles VI's queen Isabeau of Bavaria as "sluttish".

    5. Read this for a research paper on the battle of Agincourt, but read the entire thing so that I had a background of the entire war. It's very readable and fairly quick. I felt it was lacking something, though, perhaps because it's mostly a military history and does not at all delve into the social implications of the war (besides mentioning that there were some). It definitely gave me a very good sense of why the conflict arose and the series of battles that ensued. If, like me, you get a bit mix [...]

    6. Thought about giving this book four stars just because it didn't blow me away, but I really can't think of how this book could be better as an introduction to and an overview of the Hundred Years War. While it didn't knock my socks off per se, it was exactly what it claimed to be and exactly what I wanted.

    7. If you like the French, don't read it. Go read Perroy. This wonderful summary of the great war of medieval Europe is unashamedly pro-England and proud of it. A great introduction to Dark Ages life and warfare.

    8. This book was a delight and a quick read. It is not bogged down by excruciating detail, but the full picture is there. I finally understand (more or less) what the 100 Year War was about and certainly the sequence of events. Highly recommended for anyone wanting knowledge of the origins of the animosity between the English and the French or just a good read.

    9. i found this to be a highly readable and very enjoyable book on a crucial period in European history.

    10. To understand the Wars of the Roses and Henry VIII's obsession with France, we must look back at the Hundred Years War. At least that is what Desmond Seward believes and he is right. The source of the conflict he points out doesn't stem out merely from Edward III's claim to the French throne on account of his mother being the daughter of one of the most famous (and ruthless) Capetian monarchs -Philip IV "the Fair" but also from the times of Henry II. More than a claim, it was a question of sover [...]

    11. This is another of those books I really hoped to like - and I did, to a point. It's a fairly readable (if more than a tad academic and for the most part accurate rendering of this epic conflict.But it's a thoroughly British account. He presents brief and for the most part clear portraits of the English commanders, very few of the French. He seems unable to stop his enthusiasm for the battles one by the British, and begrudges nearly every victory by the French. His dismissal of Joan of Arc marks [...]

    12. Have you heard of the Hundred Years Wars but don't have a clue as to when they occurred in history and who fought them? Although written some time ago (1978), this is a readable account of the series of wars, raids, and truces during which England nearly conquered France but ended up with a bankrupt treasury--a salutary tale.This isn't just an account of "one damn battle after another" yet it gives good accounts of Crecy, Agincourt, and the final fall of the English in Normandy and Guyenne. We a [...]

    13. I read this for Medieval England university class, but it had been on my Want To Read list for awhile. This is a military history of the Hundred Years War, more from the English perspective than French. It was a strange war with more raids than sieges and more sieges than battles. It was also an incredibly ugly war: pillaging, looting, extortion, rape, torture, murder of civilians and prisoners.The two most interesting points: a negative view of Henry V ("brutal singlemindedness" and gets compar [...]

    14. 3.5/5 stars. Seward is obviously an expert on this topic, and he is very thorough. However, I'd say the general reader needs to be a bit patient at times. Seward tends to provide A LOT of detail, which often makes "the big picture" rather murky. I would suggest this book to anyone interested in the Hundred Years War, but I'd also encourage reading others for the sake of clarity. Otherwise, he presents sufficient detail about many of the major personalities from this era to make reading about the [...]

    15. This old book still has the ability to captivate its readers. I found it to be an excellent source of information about that long and terrible war. While it was easy to lose your head in the details of all the nobles involved, sticking with it the history of this fantastic and terrible time can be had. If they ever needed a idea for a captivating show this definitely would be a hit.I recommend it to those wanting a decent but thorough understanding of the hundreds' year war. It has also born in [...]

    16. Obviously 300 pages for a series of wars that spend over a hundred years isn't going to dissect every facet of the events. Honestly, I wasn't so interested in the 100 Years War that I was going to read much, if anything, on the subject beyond dancing around the edges. I was; however, delighted to find this concise and at time eloquent synopsis of the prelude to the war, the major events and the major players. This is exactly what I was looking for and it satisfied my curiosities and answered a l [...]

    17. This book covers the span of years between 1337 to 1453 when France was England's bitch. The War began due to a succession dispute between intertwined royal families. The War lasted so long mainly due to the English enjoying pillaging and plundering the French countryside and the French Valois dynasty cranking out weak, incompetent, helpless kings. Desmond Stewart downgrades Joan of Arc's role in the War from legend to a mere footnote. The lasting legacy of the War was the rise of nationalistic [...]

    18. A fascinating look at the Hundred Years War essential for the serious student or those generally interested in this period of European history. Seward shows us the military, economic, and social aspects of the war, walking us through weaponry, tactics, feudal politics, intrigue, mercenaries, plundering, sieges, taxes, etc. Key personalities, such as Philip of Burgundy and Charles VII are well described. A very interesting read overall.

    19. As other reviewers have said, Seward writes this largely from the English perspective, and his pro-English bias emerges frequently. That said, it's a good overall history, light on details but intriguing enough. It provides a clear enough and quick enough overview to get a good sense of the period and their events. A worthy supplement to other books on the Hundred Years war, the contemporary rulers, or the 14th and 15th centuries in general.

    20. On it's own it's a fascinating book, however you may want to have a basic grounding in Late Middle Ages Europe to get the most out of it.Deals primarily with political intrigue and diplomacy, which is fascinating. Battles and the experience of the common man is also touched upon thoroughly enough. But it can get confusing in terms of the sheer number of Dukes and Lords and Earls who are involved.

    21. An excellent history that covers much of the same territory as Barbara Tuchman's "A Distant Mirror" in about a third the number of pages, and from a British rather than a French perspective (although Tuchman was an American, she wrote "A Distant Mirror" from the perspective of a French nobleman). Seward's lively prose and pithy commentary keeps this sad story of juvenile hubris and mindless carnage moving to the end.

    22. Not as good as Seward's book on the Wars of the Roses, though I am perhaps a little tired of the Hundred Years War after slogging through nearly 700 pages of Barbara Tuchman. Tuchman's Distant Mirror is more vivid, but Seward is more reliable, and mercifully concise. Basically if these two books had a baby it would be the perfect overview of the Hundred Years War. As for me, I reckon I'll be reading fiction for the next few weeks.

    23. I wanted to know more about this topic, had watched a BBC series on The Hundred Years War, and wanted to read something that would be a concise overview. This book fit the requirements. It is factual, without drowning the reader in detail, the writing is a bit dry, as others have mentioned, but the author gets the job done. A relaxing read? Probably not something for the beach, but it doesn't bore one either, so long as this period of history is something you want to know more about.

    24. Very good, lots of detail which I like. Perfect example of how "absolute power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely."One hundred years of deciding the monarch of England needed to rule France as well, especially when they could not even rule England properly. In a way it is an amazing thing that we in the West have managed to create governments in which the people are sovereign. Most of the rest of the world is probably at least 100 years from that achievement.

    25. From 1337 to 1453 England repeatedly invaded France on the pretext that her kings had a right to the French throne. Though it was a small, poor country, England for most of those "hundred years" won the battles, sacked the towns and castles, and dominated the war. Hugh de Hastings, my 21st great grandfather died in the battle of Crecy, so I was looking for an overview of the conflicts.

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