The Field of Vision

The Field of Vision Winner of the National Book Award Wright Morris seems to me the most important novelist of the American middle generation Through a large body of work which unaccountably has yet to receive the wide

  • Title: The Field of Vision
  • Author: Wright Morris
  • ISBN: 9780451027610
  • Page: 126
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Winner of the National Book Award Wright Morris seems to me the most important novelist of the American middle generation Through a large body of work which, unaccountably, has yet to receive the wide attention it deserves Mr Morris has adhered to standards which we have come to identify as those of the most serious literary art His novel The Field of Vision brilliantWinner of the National Book Award Wright Morris seems to me the most important novelist of the American middle generation Through a large body of work which, unaccountably, has yet to receive the wide attention it deserves Mr Morris has adhered to standards which we have come to identify as those of the most serious literary art His novel The Field of Vision brilliantly climaxes his most richly creative period It is a work of permanent significance and relevance to those who cannot be content with less than a full effort to cope with the symbolic possibilities of the human condition at the present time John W AldridgeOne of America s most distinguished authors, Wright Morris 1910 1988 wrote thirty three books.

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      Posted by:Wright Morris
      Published :2018-09-07T11:18:48+00:00

    1 thought on “The Field of Vision”

    1. Well written but incredibly boring. Narrated from the viewpoint of several different characters I could never find a central point or, really, a story.

    2. I thought the narrative got progressively weaker. At first, I could find differences between the various characters as the omniscient narrator takes turns on their views and experiences. McKee at the beginning is not particularly likable, but he's a recognizable fellow: a narrow-minded, small-town guy who finds derisive humor is everything different from him, except his friend Boyd, whom he worships. As time goes by, the characters lose their distinctness and it's more the narrator's voice as he [...]

    3. The National Book Award winner for 1957 was a challenging read. The entire story, such as it is, takes place during a bullfight in Mexico. I have yet to read a bullfight story I liked. Most of the book consists of flashbacks concerning the people involved in the life of a man names McKee. For the entire first half of it, I was not completely sure who anyone was. Each character is a variation on eccentricity and most of them live in Omaha, Nebraska, though off the beaten path of mainstream Americ [...]

    4. 1957 National Book Award winner. I liked it at first, but soon got tired of the frequent shifts of perspective and of one character's use of "bullfight as metaphor for his life." Blame Hemingway if you like, but using bullfights as a metaphor for anything strikes me as boring. Even though it was only 250 pages, it felt overlong.

    5. The McKees at a bull fight in Mexico. The impact on the various lives of the protagonist. Young Jordon McKee is in his Davy Crockett hat and his great grandfather the old frontiersman. Boyd is the soliloquizer, squirting soda pop at the bull who loses.(read 8/14/67)

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