Wicked Women of Tudor England: Queens, Aristocrats, Commoners

Wicked Women of Tudor England Queens Aristocrats Commoners This fascinating and occasionally salacious historical study delves into the lives of six Tudor women celebrated for their reputed wickedness Collected here are illuminating accounts of Anne Boleyn an

  • Title: Wicked Women of Tudor England: Queens, Aristocrats, Commoners
  • Author: Retha M. Warnicke
  • ISBN: 9780230391925
  • Page: 434
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This fascinating and occasionally salacious historical study delves into the lives of six Tudor women celebrated for their reputed wickedness Collected here are illuminating accounts of Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard, the two consorts of Henry VIII who were executed for adultery Anne Seymour, duchess of Somerset, and Lettice Dudley, countess of Essex and Leicester, twoThis fascinating and occasionally salacious historical study delves into the lives of six Tudor women celebrated for their reputed wickedness Collected here are illuminating accounts of Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard, the two consorts of Henry VIII who were executed for adultery Anne Seymour, duchess of Somerset, and Lettice Dudley, countess of Essex and Leicester, two defamed noblewomen and Jane and Alice More, the two wives of Sir Thomas More who were charged with contrariness and shrewishness In the process, author Retha M Warnicke rescues these women from historical misrepresentations and helps us to rediscover the complex world of Tudor society.

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      Posted by:Retha M. Warnicke
      Published :2018-08-21T16:10:40+00:00

    1 thought on “Wicked Women of Tudor England: Queens, Aristocrats, Commoners”

    1. The story of six women who have been the subject of religious and misogynist criticism. Retha Warnicke chronicles their lives and point and dispels the lies. The book was really good and I was happy to read about Jane and Alice More who are very overshadowed by their martyr husband, Sir Thomas More. The latter has the worse reputation of the two. Her stepson-in-law Roper added that she was overly proud. But as Warnicke points out this was due to a land dispute the two had, one which he won in th [...]

    2. Warnicke takes six women of the Tudor era who have a bad rep and tries to present them in a new light. I have to admit that I already thought that Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard were victims of patriarchal propaganda and weren't as wicked as the history books would have us believe. I didn't know much about a couple of the women featured here but after reading this book I'm tempted to find out full length biographies of them.

    3. An examination of the sources more than the people themselves, it is well presented and makes some good points about new interpretations of the data, but oh dear God it’s depressing.

    4. This was a well-written book, and Warnicke accomplished her goal of redeeming these women who have long been presented as only wicked and wanton figures.

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