The Carpathians

The Carpathians What happens when the town of Puamahara begins to profit from its legend and the astronomers discovering the Gravity Star predict an unthinkable future Mattina Brecon a New Yorker arrives in Kowhai

  • Title: The Carpathians
  • Author: Janet Frame
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 331
  • Format: Paperback
  • What happens when the town of Puamahara begins to profit from its legend and the astronomers discovering the Gravity Star predict an unthinkable future Mattina Brecon, a New Yorker, arrives in Kowhai Street, Puamahara, where her painstaking study of her neighbours is interrupted by a new kind of cataclysmic event Mattina finds herself in possession of a Kowhai Street thaWhat happens when the town of Puamahara begins to profit from its legend and the astronomers discovering the Gravity Star predict an unthinkable future Mattina Brecon, a New Yorker, arrives in Kowhai Street, Puamahara, where her painstaking study of her neighbours is interrupted by a new kind of cataclysmic event Mattina finds herself in possession of a Kowhai Street that is without people, language or memory.This novel won the 1989 Commonwealth Writers Prize and the Ansett New Zealand Book Award It was Janet Frame s last novel.

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      Published :2018-08-22T18:33:26+00:00

    1 thought on “The Carpathians”

    1. “The human race is an elsewhere race and I am an imposter in a street of imposters. I am nothing and no-one: I was never born. I am a graduate imposter, having applied myself from my earliest years to the study of the development of imposture as practiced in myself and in others around me in street, town, city, country, and on earth. The imposture begins with the first germ of disbelief in being, in self, and this allied to the conviction of the ‘unalterable certainty of truth”, produces t [...]

    2. The Carpathians by Janet FrameI always feel a bit dumb when I read Janet Frame. I feel like I am missing the main message—as though I’m really only scratching the surface and missing out on all the layers underneath of rich and complex meaning. The Carpathians is a story about language. I think it’s a story about the power of language and the importance of words and language. Mattina is an independently wealthy New Yorker with a penchant for ‘learning’ about other cultures. By this I d [...]

    3. I really liked this book. It's actually a kind of optimistic Janet Frame book! Shock horror! Plus about two thirds of the way through the book takes a sudden left turn into surreal magic realism which I thought was both ballsy and awesome.

    4. The book jacket shows a smiling, bespectacled woman who was “[l]iterally rescued from a lobotomy at the age of 29 by the news of her first literary award.” In a note preceding the novel, Frame writes that she was greatly influenced “by [her] mother (recently dead) and by [her] father.” For these reasons, I really, really wanted to like this book.Mattina Brecon, our protagonist, is a New Yorker with enough money to buy real estate around the world, never work, to patronize indigenous New [...]

    5. a whole street of bourgeois in nice homes, in an idyllic neighborhood surrounded by peace and possibly the secret of humans in the universe, suddenly are all terrorized and eventually murdered and disappearedthing to see here folks, move along, and hey! big auction and homes for sale, homes for sale! ahh. either you are a janet frame fan or not, for the fans. a classic. too bad, my little synop is not even close to what all is going on with this novel. just the murder, none of the love.

    6. Just startedbut have heard good things said of her writing.Ok. Have since given up on this novel. I find her style overly verbose and cryptic, and not in a way that really piqued my interest. She bored me. I must be missing something here as I hear only good things about her writing.

    7. A really peculiar book, with some metafictional and magical realist touches, but that ultimately shows a singular take on the world. Frame is a writer that I definitely need to explore more of. I was rather taken with the setting in Puamahara, a fictional location that may have been modelled on Levin, the small town I lived in for a while. Frame brings an outside perspective to New Zealand provincialism but her main focus is the concept of memory and distance, which she explores through the lege [...]

    8. I really, really enjoyed this book. For its tiny size it packs a lot of punch. It brings together a small town's discovery of the Maori legend of the Memory Flower and a physics discovery of the Gravity Star, which appears to be near and far at once (and introduces other paradoxes), and adds the character of Mattina, a wealthy New York publisher who has made a habit of settling somewhere 'at the end of the word' and getting to know the locals (sometimes practically purchase the locals). This tim [...]

    9. I had read two Janet Frame novels prior to this one, Owls do cry and Scented Gardens For The Blind, but I have to admit The Carpathians was slightly less to my liking than the other two. Although 'weird' in a good sense, the story didn't manage to grab me the way the two other novels did.But at least now I've read both her first (Owls do cry) and her last (The Carpatians) novels, as well as one in between (Scented Gardens for the Blind), which gives me a better idea of her style of writing.For a [...]

    10. I wanted to read this book simply because I was fascinated by the unknown Carpathian Mountains and entranced by New Zealand. I put it on some buy list with and after more than a year a used copy appeared to me. Reading the book was similarly a slowly revealed mystery of ordinary life. It's now been some years since I read it, so I can only say that I enjoyed the experience and the writing style. I am a fan of surreal art and I think this book is also surreal.

    11. Read for my NZ lit class. This novel annoyed me in every way, and reminded me too much of David Foster Wallace, minus the obnoxiously long sentences. The characters were uninteresting, as was the plot. The structure is built around layers and layers of "imposter" writers, which normally I would like, but here just seemed excessive and pretentious. Even the novel's meditation on distance/nearness/time fell flat for me.

    12. very thought provoking. frame clearly knows how to get into the heads of her characters. the magical realism was a bit hard to integrate and made for slow going at times. it's definitely the kind of book that you want to discuss with your book loving friends. it might be one of those books that I leave on my shelf and read again in a few years.

    13. Very slow and detailed to a fault, but very atmospheric as a result. Take your time to stop and smell the flowers, and listen to some musings about language and reality.And then it goes places.Probably not for most people, but as a fan of magical realism, I loved it.̵ALP͢͡͠H̡́͠AB́͞͞ET͝ ̸͢ ́͞S̴̀͢OÙ̶́Ṕ̸̢

    14. "Il nome in questo momento mi sfugge, ma lo so, lo so" in un modo che faceva ben capire che non si trattava di una semplice metafora fatta a cuor leggero, ma che trasmetteva invece un racconto di ricerca, cattura, imprigionamento: la caccia infinita.

    15. The Carpathians is incredibly good, Frame's command of the written word is excellent. A post-modern examination of the nature of language and time, with a magic-realist twist thrown in. I think that this is my new favourite Frame.

    16. Now that I read the author bio I feel sooo bad for calling Janet Frame crazy. I didn't know it was set in New Zealand I thought she was making up her own crazy language.Automatic 5 stars

    17. My least favorite Janet Frame book so far. It was disappointing that I found it so boring since I usually love her books.

    18. Just loved this bookWith all it's surreal bits. Will remember this book for a long time. Wished we'd studied it at school

    19. Well-written and great characterisations but it felt all for naught by the end. Couldn't summon much interest in the magical realism elements.

    20. I was simultaneously annoyed and amused to discover that this novel has nothing whatsoever to do with the Carpathians, at least in any coherent sense.

    21. A surprising good book by Janet Frame. Even if is a work of fiction some autobiographical aspects of the writer's can be noticed along the plot.

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