Finding Manana: A Memoir of a Cuban Exodus

Finding Manana A Memoir of a Cuban Exodus In this unforgettable memoir Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Mirta Ojito travels back twenty five years to the event that brought her and of her fellow Cubans to America the mass exodu

  • Title: Finding Manana: A Memoir of a Cuban Exodus
  • Author: Mirta Ojito
  • ISBN: 9780143036609
  • Page: 409
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this unforgettable memoir, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Mirta Ojito travels back twenty five years to the event that brought her and 125,000 of her fellow Cubans to America the 1980 mass exodus known as the Mariel boatlift As she tracks down the long forgotten individuals whose singular actions that year profoundly affected thousands on both sides of the FloridaIn this unforgettable memoir, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Mirta Ojito travels back twenty five years to the event that brought her and 125,000 of her fellow Cubans to America the 1980 mass exodus known as the Mariel boatlift As she tracks down the long forgotten individuals whose singular actions that year profoundly affected thousands on both sides of the Florida straits, she offers a mesmerizing glimpse behind Cuba

    • Free Read [Travel Book] ï Finding Manana: A Memoir of a Cuban Exodus - by Mirta Ojito ✓
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      Posted by:Mirta Ojito
      Published :2018-09-07T10:13:40+00:00

    1 thought on “Finding Manana: A Memoir of a Cuban Exodus”

    1. There was so, so much I didn’t know about Cuba. Considering that the country is only ninety miles away and intricately tied in many historically significant ways to the U.S this book really should be required reading in our schools.As a thirteen-year-old in 1980 I had vaguely heard of a lot of boats full of Cubans heading for Florida, but I never understood the significance of this in the context of Cuba’s history, nor did I fully grasp the complexity behind more recent stories of individual [...]

    2. I LOVED this book. Cuba fascinates me, and this memoir gave such a vivid depiction of daily life in Cuba during childhood. She alternates chapters-- one about her life and her family and their exodus from Cuba with the Mariel boat lift in the early 80's, and then another that gives the historical and political context surrounding the boat lift and its aftermath. I thought it was beautiful to read and a fascinating story.

    3. This is one of the worst books I have read. It is full of lies,half truths, exaggerations, self-grandiosity , self-importance,false ideology to cover up base desires,shameless display of the crudest animal instinct toward food ,clothing and other finer things in life AND WORST OF ALL, SHAMELESS display HER BLATANT DISREGARD of her and her family 's civic duty TOWARD THE SOCIETY THAT NURTURED HER AND HER FAMILY The amazing thing about this book is it is so full of lies, almost in every pages ! Ra [...]

    4. I would recommend this book to anyone who would like to learn more about Castro's Cuba, refugees, or who isn't sure how they feel about immigration. It was amazing. 8/1/07Read again for book club and didn't find it as great as the first time, but I do think it was an informative and interesting nonfiction read for those who want to know more about Cuba.

    5. I just finished reading this book but highly reccomend it. The writing is done well without a lot of fluff. Perhaps the best aspect of the book is the education about events that tooks place in Cuba before I was even born. It starts a bit slow and it takes some time to really get into it as the characters develop a bit slow, but stick with it you will not be disapointed.

    6. Fascinating memoir of growing up in Cuba and participating in the Mariel boatlift. The author researched more than her own story, also telling how Mariel came about and the fates of some others who were involved. There is an audiobook in Spanish called El Manana.

    7. Mirta's story was fascinating and well-told, but her story didn't fill the entire book. Instead, the author filled the book with stories about historical events surrounding Cuban politics as well as other stories. I skipped these parts.The first alternative chapters were stories told from political figure perspectives and I just couldn't get into them. They seemed distant, boring, and devoid of emotion to me; well written and valuable in their own right, but not what I was looking for after I re [...]

    8. More journalism than memoir, Ojita forfeits the emotional side of her experience for a painstakingly accurate description of the Mariel Boatlift. The historical facts behind the 1980 mass emigration from Cuba to Southern Florida are fascinating, but Ojito's objectivity make for a dry story. She reveals only a thin layer of what was surely a deeply emotional experience for her and her family. As a teenager who did not speak English, she left everything she knew, and everything her family owned, f [...]

    9. The story of the Marielitas by one of the thousands who came over, grew up, and became a journalist. Finding Mañana is the stories of people who were involved in the creation of the exodus from Cuba known as the Mariel boatlift. I found the journalistic style a bit dry, but I realize that as a journalist it was perhaps easiest to keep her distance and report the facts. It is a very comprehensive piece, outlining the key players who helped start the process all the way thru to where they were ov [...]

    10. 3.5 stars. Her writing is beautiful, and she does a fabulous job of drawing you in. I loved all the different perspectives of people involved in the Mariel situation. What turned me off was the ending--she waxes political and disparages all the arguments against uncontrolled immigration. If the people in Miami aren't okay with accepting every single Cuban who wants to leave Cuba, they must be racist. I'm all for immigration, but I'm also for order. Otherwise people will end up in terrible condit [...]

    11. Not at all what I expected from a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist. I expected a touching story of the difficulties of leaving your home country and settling into a new one, as well as some detail on the hardship of living in Castro's Cuba. Book hops around constantly introducing new people, new topics. Just as you are getting into one development, the author introduces a new one with all its details. I almost put the book aside many times. Only became interesting towards the end with her descr [...]

    12. An amazing story - the author, now a journalist in the U.S left her home country of Cuba for good as part of the Mariel boat lift at the pivotal age of 16. Hard to imagine what that would be like. Ojito mixes in other true stories she collected from participants in Mariel, both large and small. I found the chronology of the interwoven stories occasionally confusing / hard to dive into, but then again I don't know much about Cuban history. It certainly is an incredible history, and overall I was [...]

    13. This was required entry reading to my University, but I ended up loving it! The reason it was chosen (other than the author being a graduate of our school) was because the goal of my school is to broaden students' international horizons, and this was the perfect choice. Everyone knows that Castro is the Cuban dictator but only those who lived through it can know how he changed simple day to day life & tasks. This book will give you insight and greater appreciation for the life you have, rega [...]

    14. A Cuban American's account of Castro's Cuba and events she experienced surrounding the 1980 Mariel boatlift which brought over 125,000 Cuban exiles to southern Florida shores. Was informative and well written, but did not connect on an emotional level, just didn't make me really feel the inner experience of it, which for me is the primary attraction of the memoir. However, author went on to win a Pulizter for her contribution to a series of articles published in NY Times.

    15. Cuba under Castro. One family's and one young girl's experiences leading up to the 1980 Mariel boatlift. Until I read this and Arenas' Before Night Falls, I, like most Americans, really had no true picture of what life under Castro was like. This isn't as gritty as Arenas' memoir, but for most people it will be much easier to read for that reason. The author, who arrived here as a teenager, has gone on to become a Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and university professor.

    16. Very well done background and personal stories, including the author's, of the Marielita boatlift of 1980. The author came over on the boatlift as a teen with her family. I very much enjoyed reading "the rest of the story" as what I remember from news accounts at the time is pretty sketchy. But I do remember being amazed at the desperate desire of so many to be free and to have a chance at a better life.

    17. This is a really great book. My father is Cuban, so I'm constantly struggling to better understand the history of Cuba and what Cubans have gone through. Mirta Ojito writes a powerful and interesting story of her own experience in Cuba and intertwines it with key facts and historical accounts. Of all the Cuban memoirs I've read, this one is my favorite.

    18. This book is about the Mariel boatlift from Cuba to Miami. My sister-in-law is Cuban, so I was interested to read it. The author came over during the boatlift when she was 16. The book goes between her own experience, and the world-wide events that lead up to this happening. A very interesting read.

    19. Ojita writes on a subject matter through which she lived as a teenager, yet the memoir is granted broader perspective by detailing the involvement of major players in this mass immigration and by the passing of 30 years. Her style is personal but also professional and readable as an experienced journalist.

    20. This is a very good book, bouncing around between politics, the author's story, and historical events. It's worth the confusion but there is a lot more I would have liked included. This book was chosen by a Women in Psychology book club I've recently joined and I look forward to reading others like it.

    21. Worth reading, Ojitos gives an journalistic description of the events leading from the Marielitos leaving Cuba to the arrival to Florida, during the Carter administration. It answers questions I had about this event and some of its implications, in a way that reads more like fiction, a page turner.

    22. A great introduction to what life was really like for a Cuban teenager who came to the US in the Mariel boatlift. I had no idea just how oppressive Castro's Cuba is/was. One of those books you can't help but share with your friends. Very well researched and beautifully written - I've been an avid fiction reader but if there is non-fiction written this well I'm converting :-)

    23. Mirta describes her life growing up in Communist Cuba and then the experience she went through when her and her family finally fled the country. After reading this book, I felt more appreciative for the freedoms we have here in America. It was a well written memoir.

    24. I learned how little I knew about our conflict with Cuba, and I enjoyed the story because the author pieced together her family story and the people involved in the historic exodus in a clear and compelling way.

    25. Finding Manana is a really interesting memoir, which I learned a lot from. It is well written and provides the reader with great insight of Castro's Cuba and the political circumstances prior to the exodus from the country from April to September 1980.

    26. This is a beautifully written memoir with well research history woven into the chronicle of the Mariel boatlift. It is also available in Spanish and I have recommended it to refugees I meet from Cuba who attend Cultural Orientation classes.

    27. This is a fabulous, engaging memoir about one family's exodus from Castro's Cuba in 1980. A slice of history I knew virtually nothing about. It was a fast read, moving, with tremendous imagery and open candor about the realities of life in a communist country.

    28. A rather disjointed history of the Cuban boat lift mixed with memoir of the author's remembrances of leaving Cuba as a teenager during the Mariel Boatlift. Would be especially interesting for those interesting or traveling to Cuba.

    29. As the child of Cuban immigrants, this was a fascinating read that gave me a better perspective on the history going on during the Mariel boat lift - the well-researched history made it even more compelling.

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