Souls of the Labadie Tract

Souls of the Labadie Tract Souls of the Labadie Tract finds Susan Howe exploring or unsettling one of her favorite domains the psychic past of America with Jonathan Edwards and Wallace Stevens as her presiding tutelary genius

  • Title: Souls of the Labadie Tract
  • Author: Susan Howe
  • ISBN: 9780811217187
  • Page: 110
  • Format: Paperback
  • Souls of the Labadie Tract finds Susan Howe exploring or unsettling one of her favorite domains, the psychic past of America, with Jonathan Edwards and Wallace Stevens as her presiding tutelary geniuses Three long poems interspersed with prose pieces, Souls of the Labadie Tract takes as its starting point the Labadists, a Utopian Quietest sect that moved from the NetherSouls of the Labadie Tract finds Susan Howe exploring or unsettling one of her favorite domains, the psychic past of America, with Jonathan Edwards and Wallace Stevens as her presiding tutelary geniuses Three long poems interspersed with prose pieces, Souls of the Labadie Tract takes as its starting point the Labadists, a Utopian Quietest sect that moved from the Netherlands to Cecil County, Maryland, in 1684 The community dissolved in 1722 In Souls, Howe is lured by archives and libraries, with their ghosts, cranks, manuscripts and scraps of material One thread winding through Souls is silken from the epigraphs of Edwards the silkworm is a remarkable type of Christ and of Stevens the poet makes silk dresses out of worms to the mulberry tree food of the silkworms and the fragment of a wedding dress that ends the book Souls of the Labadie Tract presents Howe with her signature hybrids of poetry and prose, of evocation and refraction There it is there it is you want the great wicked city Oh I wouldn t I wouldn t It s not only that you re not It s what wills and will not.

    • Best Read [Susan Howe] ☆ Souls of the Labadie Tract || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF ↠
      110 Susan Howe
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Susan Howe] ☆ Souls of the Labadie Tract || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Susan Howe
      Published :2018-05-14T16:11:02+00:00

    1 thought on “Souls of the Labadie Tract”

    1. Indifferent truth and trustam in you and of you airutterance blindness of youThat we are come to thatBetween us here to knowThings in the perfect way- pg. 27* * *Authorize me and I actwhat I am I must remainonly suffer me to tell itif I can beginning thenThen before - and then- pg. 37* * *White line of ahand's breadthA white wall adoor any placeMillennial hopescertainly part of it- pg. 43* * *"Here we are" - You can'thear us without having to beus knowing everything weknow - you know you can'tVe [...]

    2. It is wrong to write a review of her book on hand but if I don't do it while procrastinating at work I wont do it. This is I think as good a place to start with Howe's later work as any. Her work has always been intertextual but after Europe of Trusts her sources become more remote and access to her work across increasingly slender bridges. And as much as I like THE IDEA of an entire book on bedhangings, I think I first need someone to convince me how a book on bed hangings fits--nay hinges!--in [...]

    3. A beautiful book. Howe's relation to the past gets richer and richer. Here I especially love the title sequence, where a "you" gradually accumulates, addressed by ghosts from lost history and the final sequence, "A Fragment of the Wedding Dress of Sarah Pierpont Edwards," with its final narrowing slit or eye, as if time is again receding, closing up the profoundly moving sense, in this very visual work, of a time that time itself passes through, or the movements of a contemporary reader's time i [...]

    4. Excellent: a little difficult for me & took (as all her works do, but this especially) a number of readings to begin to grasp. Well worth the time.Ellie NYC

    5. Howe's poetry is chiefly "not sensible", at least to me, but her tight nuggets of language hover, often beautifully, near to sense, and her subjects, sometimes announced in prose, are fascinating. The last of the longish poems here is as much concrete poetry, or visual art, as "regular" poetry. I didn't find myself quite as taken by this book as by the more recent That This, but still, this is so far outside the American poetic mainstream--courteous ruminations on ordinary life--that I immediate [...]

    6. Susan Howe’s poetry brings the mythical past with its almost insignificant details into the becoming of the present beyond historical implications. Echoes of Dickinson and Woolf haunt her words.

    7. a fog of words in which one sees pieces of the past which are then swallowed up by the present and the process of considering them. and i'm learning to appreciate collage pieces--tho i would love to see the actual pieces of paper as opposed to the facsimile necessary for putting them in a book. poetry of thinking about thinking.

    8. She writes essays with no equal. And some of her poetry veers off beyond understanding, but some of these strange cubes are among my favorite poems, my absolute favorite poems-- "what fire is this, that wells from the illuminated manuscript, leaf through it, go on, touch" (Hilda Hilst). But it's a cool flame, in a soul that reaches, and is quiet, and kisses lightly.Essays: 5Poetry: 3.75

    9. 'America in a skin coatthe color of the juice ofmulberries' her fantasticcap full of eyes will leadour way as mind or earsGoodnight goodnight"The future seemed to lie in this forest of theories, letters, and forgotten actualities. I felt a harmony beyond the confinement of our being merely dross or tin"

    10. "Armed with call numbers, I find my way among scriptural exegeses, ethical homiletics, antiquarian researches, tropes and allegories, totemic animal parents, prophets, and poets. My retrospective excursions follow the principle that ghosts wrapped in appreciative obituaries by committee members, or dedications presented at vanished community field meetings, can be reanimated by appropriation."

    11. I might not have read this book at all if it weren't for Sharon (thanks, Sharon!)It's the best book of poems I've read by SH, at least since The Europe of Trusts.

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