Cion

Cion A Picador Paperback OriginalThe hero of Zakes Mda s beloved Ways of Dying Toloki sets down with a family in Middle America and uncovers the story of the runaway slaves who were their ancestors Tolok

  • Title: Cion
  • Author: Zakes Mda
  • ISBN: 9780312427061
  • Page: 186
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Picador Paperback OriginalThe hero of Zakes Mda s beloved Ways of Dying, Toloki, sets down with a family in Middle America and uncovers the story of the runaway slaves who were their ancestors.Toloki, the professional mourner, has come to live in America Lured to Athens, Ohio, by an academic at the local university, Toloki makes friends with an angry young man he meetsA Picador Paperback OriginalThe hero of Zakes Mda s beloved Ways of Dying, Toloki, sets down with a family in Middle America and uncovers the story of the runaway slaves who were their ancestors.Toloki, the professional mourner, has come to live in America Lured to Athens, Ohio, by an academic at the local university, Toloki makes friends with an angry young man he meets at a Halloween parade and soon falls in love with the young man s sister Toloki endears himself to a local quilting group and his quilting provides a portal to the past, a story of two escaped slaves seeking freedom in Ohio.Making their way north from Virginia with nothing but their mother s quilts for a map, the boys hope to find a promised land where blacks can live as free men Their story alternates with Toloki s, as the two narratives cast a new light on America in the twenty first century and on an undiscovered legacy of the Underground Railroad.

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      Posted by:Zakes Mda
      Published :2018-08-27T22:13:02+00:00

    1 thought on “Cion”

    1. I had not read of Ways of Dying or heard of Zakes Mda before reading the Essence article that featured Cion as the October 2007 book of the month. Based on the article's synopsis, I knew it was a book I wanted to read, so I ordered it immediately - in doing so, I have no regrets - what an insightful, creative, and often humorous read! Cion follows the travels of Toloki, a professional mourner (which in itself is an unusual profession), as he ventures to Southeastern Ohio (Appalachian country). I [...]

    2. It took me a little while to figure out what was going on in this book, and many of the characters never developed in my imagination, but I really liked it. The author does a great job intervweaving a past story line with the present. The past story is about slavery in the US south; the current story is a "professional mourner" from South Africa who has come to the US to learn more about mourning.

    3. I was befuddled initially but so glad I stuck with it. If you are familiar with Athens County, OH or Ohio University's Halloween bash, you'll be more interested in this.

    4. That was a smooth read. Although the passage is a bit sophisticated, the letters and sentences read as though it was furnished to give you a smooth ride on the way to the dreamland. It reads as though a dream incarcerated in a book.

    5. A Big Thumbs DownThis book, Cion, by Zakes Mda, is very hard to read especially in the beginning. It is a far-fetched, disconnected story that jumps all over the place. To top it off the main character, Toloki, is a professional mourner. It is full of vile sexual content and foul language. The book recieved great praise by a few descendants who claim to have read it. Did they not see the insult to their people, be it true or not? I do feel that Mr. Mda captured the essence of the area, Kilvert, [...]

    6. This is a wonderful book written by a South African, now an American, who lived through the apartheid in his country. I was amazed at how well he portrayed the events of American slavery showing how two brothers, one sired by a white man and the other by a slave, escape to freedom via the designs on the quilts their mother made for them. One of the quilts survived through one of the brothers, giving only half a story to his present day descendants. As a result, the family’s matriarch holds her [...]

    7. This book was definitely something else! I really liked it, but still don't quite know what to make of it. It's well-written and I really like the way Mda weaves the chapters through past and present(I have a special affinity for any author who "plays" with time in narrative). This book also made me go and do my own research on breeding plantations, as I had no clue they existed. All in all, I'd recommend it for anyone who's looking for a fresh voice, and a unique (to say the least) point of vie [...]

    8. A South African author has written this unusual book about the contemporary American South. Ruth is an African-American matriarch who runs her husband, grown children, garden and kitchen with a formidable energy driven by an indomitable right-wing Christian perspective. All believable, amazingly enough, this character alone makes this book worth reading.

    9. Oh my goodness. I don't know what to say. I loved it, I guess, although admitedly it was confusing. It was very circular, or maybe more spiral-y. I love the story, though, and I love the dignity Mda gives to the undeniably ignorant. Because people deserve respect, first and foremost, on the basis of being people. We have to remember that.

    10. By an Ohio U. prof, set here in and around Athensn't wait to read it. I'll be happy if it's anywhere near as fantastic as the prequel, Ways of Dying (set, like all of Mda's novels up to this point, in Africa) Go Zakes!

    11. A unique way to tell old US slave history which carries over to modern issues. At times the story had me thinking to Brink's 'Devil's Valley,' but with much happier overtones.

    12. I read about this author & his book in my OU alumni magazine. I was entrigued by the book's setting, Athens OH. Our book club read it, we bought quilts as part of our dissuasion.

    13. Random and smart. I never really got a grip on it, but I never got the urge to walk away either. I love books that explore history through the present. Wish I had read Ways of Dying first.

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