Voyage of a Summer Sun: Canoeing the Columbia River

Voyage of a Summer Sun Canoeing the Columbia River On the morning of June high up in the Canadian Rockies Robin Cody pushed his sixteen foot forty seven pound Kevlar canoe through tall grass and mud to launch it on peaceful Columbia Lake

  • Title: Voyage of a Summer Sun: Canoeing the Columbia River
  • Author: Robin Cody
  • ISBN: 9781570610837
  • Page: 153
  • Format: Paperback
  • On the morning of June 18, 1990, high up in the Canadian Rockies, Robin Cody pushed his sixteen foot, forty seven pound Kevlar canoe through tall grass and mud to launch it on peaceful Columbia Lake, the nominal source of the river that heaves water into the Pacific Ocean than any other in North or South America the Columbia For the next eighty two days, Cody wouldOn the morning of June 18, 1990, high up in the Canadian Rockies, Robin Cody pushed his sixteen foot, forty seven pound Kevlar canoe through tall grass and mud to launch it on peaceful Columbia Lake, the nominal source of the river that heaves water into the Pacific Ocean than any other in North or South America the Columbia For the next eighty two days, Cody would steer his canoe around massive dams, through killer rapids, and across reservoirs the size of small states, plunging 2,750 feet in 1,200 miles and passing right through his hometown of Portland, Oregon, before reaching the open sea Undertaken with no particular goal in mind, with no great point to prove, the solo voyage would churn up myth, memory, and unexpected truths about the magnificent natural phenomenon that dominates the landscape, economy, and spirit of the Pacific Northwest To the tent dwelling canoeist, animals play an often funny, sometimes scary, role bear, moose, coyote, beaver, deer, osprey, heron, loon But, as Cody soon realizes, nature, in real time, is not a dependable entertainment Untethered thought takes over, and human contact, human language, is craved Cody s cravings are met by a host of colorful riverfolk Virginia Wyena, the grandmother of seventeen who pronounces for him the unspellable Wanapum name for the Columbia Wayne Houlbrook, a would be adventure guide and actual companion through daunting Redgrave Canyon Mary Yadernuk, a seventy three year old trapper of the old school Ben Seibold, a wood butcher on hand for the raising of Grand Coulee Dam during the Great Depression Lucille Worsham, who counts the fish swimming by her station down in the bowels of Bonneville Dam even a couple of anonymous gossiping teenagers in a hardware store A consummate listener, Cody learns that few are satisfied with the contortions the modern Columbia has been made to undergo for the sake of hydraulic and nuclear power, and that the environment is indeed in grave cris

    • ✓ Voyage of a Summer Sun: Canoeing the Columbia River || Ì PDF Read by ↠ Robin Cody
      153 Robin Cody
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Voyage of a Summer Sun: Canoeing the Columbia River || Ì PDF Read by ↠ Robin Cody
      Posted by:Robin Cody
      Published :2018-09-13T06:54:32+00:00

    1 thought on “Voyage of a Summer Sun: Canoeing the Columbia River”

    1. I find myself more and more drawn to rivers. Last summer I got to float a short segment of the Willamette with some friends, and had a magical time. Since then I've been thinking about trying to float from Portland to Astoria next summer on some kind of junk barge, and doing some research on the matter. I forget how I heard about this book, but it's pretty much the perfect document: a guy somewhat like myself (but much better at boats) describes the entire length of the Columbia from the seat of [...]

    2. The Columbia River has fascinated me all of my life. From the history of industry at its mouth at Astoria to the haunting tales from its source in the Rocky Mountain trench of British Columbia it is a river of tremendous power and beauty. The Columbia River even made college English literature come alive with the musings of William Cullen Bryant in his poem Thanatopsis where he alludes to the Columbia:“Or lost thyself in the continuous woods Where rolls the Oregan, and hears no sound, Save his [...]

    3. If you’re looking for the best book to read about the Columbia River, this may be it. And even if you’re not, I highly recommend Robin Cody's book for anyone interested in understanding this vital artery of the environment, ecology & economy of the Pacific Northwest.For some reason in the mid 1990s, there was a spate of books published about the Columbia River and over the years I have been trying to determine which one to read, which one offered the perspective I sought whenever I’ve [...]

    4. I was a bit aprehensive about reading this book, just because I thought that it may be a bit dry. Instead it was a completely delightful read and really interesting. I loved the way the author eased his way into the actual canoe trip by giving the reader a background of his family and his Dads love of the river. Robin Cody gives a wonderful history of the Columbia river and the dam's that provide the Pacific Northwest with power, as well as colorful accounts of his trip and the characters he mee [...]

    5. This book is wonderfully written. He connects you with the esthetics of the river along with history and environmental impacts of the dams. He does so through facts, interviews and is not judgemental though it would be difficult to igore the conclusions of man's impact. If you are interested in more info on the whole water in the west history Cadillac Desert is an excellent book. It turns out this wasn't done so much for the people but for the politicians. what a surprise!!!

    6. A nice introduction to the history of the Pacific Northwest, and a wonderful snapshot of the Columbia River in the early 90s. The issues facing the river and those depending on it are still recognizable now, 25 years later, but some things have changed. Cody writes with an interesting mix of styles - dryly humorous, swept-away Romantic, matter-of-fact/perfunctory - that helps emotionally underscore his narrative. All told, a good read.

    7. Fantastic! For anyone who would like to know more about the adventure of navigating a large river, or how human development has changed the face of the river over time. Read this just after seeing "Grand Coulee Dam" on The American Experience.

    8. This story really made me want to jump in my canoe and get out on the water. The tale gets a little boring after Hanford, but the river above sounded really interesting. Lots of history on the Columbia.

    9. Compelling and sobering. Cody travels the length of the Columbia River from Canadian headwaters to Astoria, reporting the both the beauty of the land and river, as well as the degradation of the environment.

    10. Cody takes us on a meandering canoe journey from the source of the Columbia river to the sea. Somewhat dated and a little self-indulgent but still interesting. Sasquatch Books gets negative points for the book falling to pieces in my hands as I read it.

    11. It was enjoyable and easy to read. The history of the river and people and especially the dams on the river was a good part of the book.

    12. Good book that kept me engaged with the Authors journey down the Columbian River. I liked how he engaged with and wrote about the local communities along the river.

    13. i learned a lot about the damming of the columbia and the people and land it has effected. you should read it. seriously.

    14. Paddling from source to mouth of the Columbia with Robin Cody gives you a great look at geography, culture, wildlife and stories. Great Northwest read.

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