Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction

Forever Free The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction From one of our most distinguished historians comes a groundbreaking new examination of the myths and realities of the period after the Civil War Drawing on a wide range of long neglected documents E

  • Title: Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction
  • Author: Eric Foner Joshua Brown
  • ISBN: 9780375702747
  • Page: 400
  • Format: Paperback
  • From one of our most distinguished historians comes a groundbreaking new examination of the myths and realities of the period after the Civil War.Drawing on a wide range of long neglected documents, Eric Foner places a new emphasis on black experiences and roles during the era We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in shaping Reconstruction, anFrom one of our most distinguished historians comes a groundbreaking new examination of the myths and realities of the period after the Civil War.Drawing on a wide range of long neglected documents, Eric Foner places a new emphasis on black experiences and roles during the era We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in shaping Reconstruction, and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood He compellingly refutes long standing misconceptions of Reconstruction, and shows how the failures of the time sowed the seeds of the Civil Rights struggles of the 1950s and 60s Richly illustrated and movingly written, this is an illuminating and essential addition to our understanding of this momentous era.

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      400 Eric Foner Joshua Brown
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      Posted by:Eric Foner Joshua Brown
      Published :2018-09-19T22:09:43+00:00

    1 thought on “Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction”

    1. RECOMMENDED! I read this book (Forever Free) just as I was completing the volume on the Civil War and Reconstruction by Page Smith (Trial by Fire: A People's History of the Civil War and Reconstruction). Mr. Foner's book is a much shorter read, but both he and Mr. Smith are primary source historians, which means that we who read them "hear" from hundreds of real people whom previous histories have often totally ignored.Mr. Foner, who is my age, refers to the Civil Rights Movement of the '50s and [...]

    2. Foner writes well. This is the first thing you should know. You will not be reading a dusty tome of long-ago lives. You will read about actual people from just a few short years ago, how they felt, how they struggled, what they wanted, what they hoped for. You will get in touch with these people, some enslaved, some free, some made free. Some were the people who worked for freedom, and some were those who upheld slavery. It is all a mess in a way, just like life, but Foner extracts the threads a [...]

    3. I recall believing much of the fiction the book sets out to discredit. Even as late as college I remember telling someone the Civil War wasn't really about slavery -- it was about economics and states rights. What I didn't realize then was that was code for slavery. The Union may have entered the Civil War to preserve the United States, but by the end it was fully fighting for an end to slavery. This book picks up where my knowledge of the era ended: Reconstruction. I knew Reconstruction to have [...]

    4. After watching the Ken Burns Civil War series, I felt I had to tackle a gap in my history - what happened after the end of the Civil War, Lincoln's assassination, and the newly freed black population.Forever Free: was a great, readable, reflection. It delved into the 14, 15, 16th Amendments, the meaning of freedom as viewed by the former slaves, the elite white southern planters, and the various views of Northerners.Racism did not die, it reformed in the emergence of the KKK, and institutionaliz [...]

    5. The author, Eric Foner, is a noted historian on Reconstruction . For many years, the Reconstruction era has been widely misunderstood, especially the role played by former slaves in building a new life for themselves. Mr Foner sets the record straight by explaining Presidential and Radical Reconstruction and the incomplete promise of Reconstruction. He presents the perspective of white plantation owners and leaders, other white Southerners, freedmen and women, and Northerners. Interspersed are c [...]

    6. "What is freedom? Is it the bare privilege of not being chained? If this is all, then freedom is a bitter mockery, a cruel delusion." -Congressman James Garfield, 1865. I wanted to read this book because I knew very little about one of the most significant and radical time periods in our history: Reconstruction. I learned in school about carpetbaggers and scalawags, and that freed slaves were promised but did not receive 40 acres and a mule. I learned very little else about Reconstruction.But th [...]

    7. The historical representation of Reconstruction has, from the outset, been a site of ideological struggle, not only for truth, but for social justice. Foner's excellent book debunks myths about the Reconstruction. If you still believe that the post-Civil War south was invaded by Carpetbaggers and Scalawags, then you need to read this book. Using lithographs and other visual artifacts from the era, Foner and Joshua Brown demonstrate the role that representation plays in American attitudes toward [...]

    8. This was a truly fantastic and in-depth chronicle of the primary aspects of the Reconstruction. He looks at Lincoln's shifting stance through his electoral run, presidency, and assassination. He touches on Lincoln's probable Reconstruction plans. He moves on to the effect of Johnsons' Reconstruction plan, the reaction of moderate Republicans in supporting the Radial Republican policies in light of Johnson's leniency toward the treasonous Confederate brass, the Southern intransigence and the even [...]

    9. Fantastic book. Perhaps this is obvious to those who are already familiar with the history of Reconstruction, but Forever Free really hit home the point for me that you can't understand the 20th century civil rights movement without understanding what happened—and did not happen—during Reconstruction. Also, the structure of this book, with longer chapters of straight history by Foner split up by short essays by Joshua Brown on the visual culture of the Civil War/Reconstruction era and how th [...]

    10. What makes this book so great right now is that it shows how African Americans were actually active agents in there liberation before and during the Civil War and takes head on the myth of Reconstruction as told in movies like a Birth of a Nation and seemingly the whole white population of Georgia when I grew up. It was a great read and highly recommend to anyone who wants to stop the Great Lie we have been told about reconstruction.

    11. An excellent history of America during the years of reconstruction. A balanced approach to the subject, quite free of any political bias the author may or may not have himself. I was very pleased to see yesterday that Mr. Foner was just awarded a Pulitzer Prize for one of his Civil War Histories--a well deserved award for a fine author.

    12. A Must Read!Provides a crucial point of view on an often misrepresented segment of this country's history. To understand what occurred before during and after Reconstruction, is to gain a better understanding of the racial unrest this country is currently facing.

    13. Taught me more about the Civil War, Reconstruction, an the significance of the 14th and 15th amendments than I learned in years of school. If you think you know what Reconstruction was about, you are probably wrong.

    14. A history of Reconstruction which focuses on the experience of Black Americans. It begins with the origins of slavery and extends to the Civil Rights Era and today, but the main focus is Reconstruction. It provides a nice explanation of the generally untold contributions and experiences of the newly freed (and African-Americans born free). It also includes a series of visual essays demonstrating the messages and power of images of African-Americans throughout history. The text gets a bit bogged [...]

    15. This is a history of the reconstruction period following the US Civil war. During this time, the representatives of the victorious union tried to put into practices the peace arrangements of the Civil War, with an intent to eventually bring the rebellios states back into the United States. As a critical part of this, efforts were made to implement the necessary changes to ensure that slavery was abolished and that freedman in the South were able to practice their freedom by voting, obtaining an [...]

    16. I wanted to increase my knowledge of Reconstruction, since my grammar school classes taught me no more than the term. Now I understand why the administrators of MCPS didn't encourage teaching of this complicated, non-cinematic period of history. It's a political hot potato. I can see the well-educated, engaged parents of Montgomery County, Maryland, calling the school board in fury, some complaining that the presentation is too sympathetic to blacks, others complaining that it is not sympathetic [...]

    17. A moderately satisfying short survey of Reconstruction by Foner, one of the foremost historians of the era. At a scant 238 pages, Forever Free doesn't really do a great job of telling the history of Reconstruction but for some broad brushstrokes. The cover purports to draw from contemporary black source documents but generally fails in that regard. A far better example of such an approach (in a book about the same length) is James McPherson's "The Negro's Civil War" which drew extensively on pap [...]

    18. A pared-down version of previous Foner books, with interesting photo essays by Brown. Foner's central thesis is that Reconstruction was America's greatest, if not only chance to achieve racial equality. Its failure, he argues, prevented the post-Civil War wounds from healing. Foner demolishes the Dunning School of lazy blacks and crooked Republicans ruining the South: instead, he depicts biracial Republican rule as efficient, despite constant violence and intimidation by racist Democrats. Foner' [...]

    19. Superb. Starts out slowly, but from "Tocsin of Freedom" through the end, the book is impossible to set aside. This is a story of the CounterRevolution, the Counter-Terror, really, triumphing. The parallels between the First Reconstruction, the Second Reconstruction, and what is happening right now with the focus on racial and economic deprivation/inequality in the US are striking. The visual essays are a nice addition to the text. My one wish was that the book could have been more detailed when [...]

    20. In seven short chapters, accompanied by six chapters which analyze the role of media during this time, Foner presents a condensed version of his works here, starting with the history of slavery, going through the Civil War and Reconstruction and ending with the establishment of Jim Crow. Foner is a leading scholar in Reconstruction, and in rehabilitating it's legacy as a truly revolutionary period, where hopes at a biracial equitable state were had for a decade, before being tragically (finally) [...]

    21. Aimed at a general audience, this book combines an overview of Reconstruction and its aftermath up to the present written by distinguished historian Eric Foner with a series of visual essays that decode the various ways Africans and African Americans were depicted in the popular media. The text is authoritative without being too dense. Good use of details and examples support his analysis. The essays on cartoons, portraits, newspaper illustrations and other forms of visual representation provide [...]

    22. Familiar territory for anyone relatively well versed in the epic of Reconstruction, Forever Free is a sweeping yet scrupulously detailed account of these critically significant years. The central insight of this and other similar works (many of which are also Foner’s) is probably that Reconstruction was ultimately as important as the Civil War if not more so in shaping the U.S. as we knew it in the 20th century and into the present. It was Reconstruction – not the Civil War – that constitu [...]

    23. This book is highly recommended and a very timely read if you want deeper insight into the origins of today's civil rights conflicts in the U.S. Foner offers a fresh new perspective on the role African Americans played in their struggle for freedom, citizenship, equal rights and respect during the Emancipation and Reconstruction era. He offers a very readable concise book loaded with pictorial documents that highlight the "black experience" - a perspective not often told.

    24. If you read any history book on Reconstruction, read Eric Foner. This book's focus on African Americans though proves that the North won the war but the South won the peace. It details the beautiful promises Reconstruction held for African Americans and the possibility of some sort of racial equality following the war but how it ended so badly and instead created the most brutal era for African Americans. Easy, quick but informative read.

    25. I read this book for a Civil War class, and really enjoyed it. The pictures, and art really added to the narrative. I liked that the epilogue bridged the Reconstruction to the 1960s or Second Reconstruction. Well written, entertaining prose, fantastic research. I learned a lot!Definitely recommend.

    26. Engaging if brief review of one of the most deliberately overlooked and distorted periods of American history. Fascinating and heartbreaking to read (and see, via the contemporary illustrations) how close America came to creating an interracial multicultural society in the late 1860's, only to be undone by a combination of violent racism and Northern white apathy.

    27. Foner is the foremost authority on Reconstruction, and this book is only a small glimpse into his brilliant interpretation on the subject. If I wasn't so pressed for time and forced to direct my reading to different subjects (English history), I would definitely pick up more of his work. This was very readable, and I would recommend it to anyone who wishes to learn more about Reconstruction.

    28. The best book that I've read on Reconstruction. Concise, gripping, and informative, it makes Reconstruction vault off the pages as an incredibly essential and dramatic part of our national narrative.

    29. A nice book especially with the additional visual essays (have a magnifying glass ready to get all the details) and yet I came away feeling unsatisfied. The best history books package the information in a powerful sweeping narrative. This felt more like a collection of facts - a little dry.

    30. Excellent and moving story of the truth about Reconstruction and its failures. Even though it is hard to read at times, everyone should read this book. Within the book, Eric Foner includes visual essays that are especially informative and compelling.

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